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2000 Year in Review

January 13th Guardian file photo Parking Spaces Created for Winter Quarter By Vincent Gragnani Guardian file photo In order to accommodate student needs, Transportation and Parking Services recently opened 729 parking spaces by Voigt Drive on the east side of Interstate 5. Director of Parking and Transportation Services Greg Snee said the new lot on the east campus provides enough spaces for students. “”With the opening of the second phase of the Regents lot, we should have overly sufficient parking for the rest of the academic year,”” Snee said. January 18th Muir College Suitcase Dance Awards Trip for Two By Jane Kim Nearly 100 Muir students packed their suitcases and headed to the Suitcase Dance at Sierra Summit on Friday night. The main attraction of the night was an all-expenses paid trip for two Muir College students to an undisclosed destination for the three-day weekend. “”Usually, a dance is just a dance. But this one kind of has a slight twist to it,”” said Muir Sophomore Senator Shige Itoh, who chaired the Suitcase Dance Committee. “”People are supposed to come with a bag packed for any weather, and we’re trading their bag for a raffle ticket.”” The twist was that the winner and a guest had to be ready to leave on the spot. The predetermined destination, Chicago, was kept secret until the winner was announced. The trip for two included hotel accommodations, airfare, transportation to the airport in a black stretch limousine, $200 in spending money and beanie-style hats. Other prizes included gift certificates and Muir Musical tickets. Freshman Sierra Fisk was the lucky winner. January 20th Edwards Named Athletic Director By Robert Fulton The UCSD athletic department announced yesterday that Earl Edwards has been named the new Athletic Director, effective March 1. Edwards will succeed Judith M. Sweet, who resigned after 24 years to resume a teaching position within the university. “”We had a searching process with a committee,”” explained Joseph Watson, UCSD’s vice chancellor of student affairs, who made the final decision of who would fill the empty spot. “”They made some recommendations. I think that Mr. Edwards would be a good selection.”” Edwards served as UCSD’s associate athletic director from 1987-1993. While previously serving UCSD, he initiated the Triton Athlete Associates, the athletic department’s primary fundraising source. He also served on numerous campus committees, supervised six intercollegiate sports and served as acting athletic director in the absence of the athletic director. For the past seven years, Edwards has served as director of athletics at East Stroudsburg University in East Stroudsburg, Penn. January 27th Revelle Students Protest RCC By Scott Dobroski The Revelle College Council had an unusual influx of visitors at its weekly Tuesday meeting when dozens of students participated in a sit-in — organized and led by RCC Publicity, Media and Campus Relations Director Kris Erickson — in protest of the way the RCC is run. The RCC is the governing body of Revelle College and all of Revelle’s standing committees. Erickson said his goal in organizing the peaceful demonstration was to show the RCC that institutional changes in the framework of the council are both desired and needed. January 31st Angelou Accepts Offer to Speak By Matt Schrader After almost two months of debate and uncertainty, Maya Angelou accepted UCSD’s offer to speak at this year’s all-campus commencement, to be held June 12. “”In a world with only a few household names, Maya Angelou has become one,”” said Vice Chancellor Jim Langley. “”She is one of the most important voices in not only world literature, but also in modern thinking.”” A.S. President Tesh Khullar, who headed the search for a graduation speaker along with A.S. Programmer Scott Mantell, said he is pleased with Angelou’s commitment and that he expects students to respond positively to her speech. “”I am beyond happy right now,”” Khullar said. “”In my opinion, this is one of the most important things that the A.S. has done all year.”” February 7th Athletes Given Priority Registration By Robert Fulton For the first time, athletes at UCSD will be granted priority registration, according to Richard Backer, assistant vice chancellor of enrollment management, and registrar. Starting fall of 2000, athletes will be at the top of the list as far as the rush for classes is concerned. Acting Athletic Director Regina Sullivan said the decision will allow athletes to have more uniform practice sessions and studying hours. ResNet Blocks Access to Napster By Vincent Gragnani UCSD Residential Networking blocked access last weekend to Napster, a software program that allows people to share mp3 files. ResNet officials said use of the software was slowing campus Internet traffic. ResNet Coordinator Erik Strahm said the measure is only temporary. Napster is a client software that not only provides people with a way of searching for and downloading mp3 files, but also makes the mp3 files on the host machine available for downloading. In a letter sent out to all ResNet subscribers, ResNet officials stated that they saw the use of Napster increase at an incredible rate over the last six months. The letter stated that last weekend, Napster uploads and downloads saturated the campus Internet connection, slowing all campus Internet traffic and impairing the vital functions of the network, such as education and research. February 10th Women’s Basketball Sets School Record By Robert Fulton Words fail to appropriately convey the all-out dominance of the UCSD women’s basketball game against La Sierra University at home on Tuesday night. “”Blow-out,”” “”laughter”” and “”demolish”” come to mind to describe what loosely could be called a contest, but these words all fall short of describing what really happened. How about 103-19? That’s right, the Triton women’s basketball team downed the Golden Eagles of La Sierra 103-19 in front of a pleased but shocked home crowd. The winning margin of 84 points (84!) is the largest in Triton history, eclipsing the previous mark set in 1987 as the Tritons blew out Mills College 100-19. February 14th TeSS Gets the Axe for StudentLink By Vincent Gragnani Beginning this fall, students will no longer be able to register for classes using the university’s telephone enrollment system and will instead have to use StudentLink. The change will save the university $28,000. “”We are planning on dropping [telephone registration] as of Sept. 1 and asking students to use the Web specifically,”” said Richard Backer, associate vice chancellor of enrollment management, and registrar. Backer said he made the decision in consultation with students and administrators after seeing the increasing popularity of students registering for classes over the Web. March 6th Michael Campaign Stirs Controversy By Parisa Baharian Michael Carley, a Warren senior, gave his personal testimony regarding his faith in Christianity Friday at noon at the Price Center. Carley is the student at the center of the weeklong “”I agree with Michael”” campaign that caused controversy among students. The campaign is sponsored by Campus Crusade for Christ in cooperation with several student-run Christian organizations. Supporters say that its aim is to spread the Christian message of living a life according to the Word in order to be saved. Campaign participants wore blue “”I agree with Michael”” shirts and manned tables throughout campus to support their cause. The campaign stirred disagreement among students. April 17th Independent Slate Dominates Election By Matt Schrader The decrease in student voter participation in last week’s A.S. Council elections did not alter the rejoicing and cheers last Thursday of Independent slate members, who took victory in all but one of the nine A.S. campuswide positions. “”I think my reaction after they announced it spells it all,”” A.S. President-elect Doc Khaleghi said. “”It is very exciting to know that I had the support of undergraduates. What is about to come can seem overwhelming, but I am looking forward to it.”” Khaleghi, the founder of the Independent slate, defeated fellow candidates Scott Mantell, Ali Yazdi, Derrick Yee and Tariq Parwani. Men’s Volleyball Wins National Championship By Bill Burger Prospects did not look good for the UCSD men’s volleyball team heading into this season. The team had lost three of its top players from the previous year, and a new coach, its third in three years, was taking the helm. These changes, combined with two straight years of missing the National Championship Tournament, made this look like a rebuilding year for the Tritons. Looks can be very deceiving. This season saw the Tritons go undefeated in Division III play and earn their first Mountain Pacific Sports Federation win in two years. It also saw them return to the National Championship Tournament, a tournament that won this weekend with two three-game wins in Hoboken, N.J. April 27th A.S. Executive Council Escapes Impeachment By MATT SCHRADER The A.S. Council fell two votes short of impeaching A.S. President Tesh Khullar, Vice President Internal Jennifer Lee and Vice President Finance Eric Rovner after a special A.S. committee requested that the three executives resign for falsifying receipts that were reimbursed with student funds. Khullar, Lee and Rovner were investigated by the committee after attending a New York City leadership conference in March. After three interview sessions with the conference attendants, the committee found that the executives falsified receipts upon their return from New York. May 18th All-Campus Commencement Canceled By Vincent Gragnani Chancellor Dynes canceled this year’s all-campus commencement Tuesday after Maya Angelou said she would be unable speak at graduation. Angelou told UCSD officials earlier this week she will have double knee surgery June 13 and that she regretted having to cancel the commencement address, which was scheduled to be held June 17. Chancellor Dynes said he considered the possibility of securing another speaker but concluded that not enough time remained. May 22nd Electra Kicks Off Sun God Festivities on ‘The Gleib Show’ By Matt Schrader Carmen Electra was the guest star of “”The Gleib Show”” Thursday night when Ben Gleiberman hosted his last episode at the Price Center Plaza at 8 p.m. to kick off the Sun God 2000 festivities. “”I thought it was really good,”” said Marshall freshman Brain Capanna. “”Going in, I didn’t expect it was going to be this way.”” September 19th New Parking Structure Opens By Vincent Gragnani The new Gilman Parking Structure, which contains 858 parking spaces, opened Monday at 7 a.m. after a year of construction. The opening, however, does not necessarily mean relief for students looking for more convenient parking. Greg Snee, director of Parking and Transportation Services, said that due to the closing of the north parking lots, there are now fewer student spaces than there were in spring. Triton Sports Moves into Division II By Robert Fulton Good-bye to the small schools and the easy wins. Hello to a whole new world. UCSD’s athletics program is venturing into uncharted territory with its move to Division II competition. The Tritons previously played their games in Division III, winning numerous championships. Now, with a higher level of play, the competition will be tougher. “”Primarily, it’s the right thing for us to do right now with the growth of the institution,”” UCSD Director of Athletics Earl Edwards said. “”We’re at 19,000 and prepared to go to 30,000 in the next few years. That’s a much larger student population than most Division III schools have.”” October 12th Ribbon Cut for UCSD’s New Undergraduate Libary By STEVE LEHTONEN Hailed as the first University of California library of the 21st century, the newly remodeled undergraduate library, CLICS, held its ribbon-cutting ceremony on Wednesday at Galbraith Hall near the Revelle Plaza. October 30th Chancellor’s 5K Run Raises Money for Scholarships By Lara Moscrip Over 1,000 students, staff, faculty and alumni braved the damp and the drizzle Friday afternoon to try to raise undergraduate scholarship money and defeat Chancellor Robert Dynes on the course of the fifth annual Chancellor’s 5K. Dynes kicked off the race by announcing “”Let’s go do it,”” and participants flocked to the starting point at RIMAC field. Corporate and individual sponsors helped to raise funds for undergraduate scholarships. Dynes and professor Frances Dynes-Hellman donated $25 for every person who beat Dynes and for every woman who passed Dynes-Hellman. The event raised approximately $178,000, an increase from last year’s total of $158,000. December 2nd Women’s Soccer Wins National Championship The UCSD women’s soccer team stormed onto the Division II scene and not only took the tough CCAA conference, but went on to capture the national championship as well. This win came one year after the team captured the Division III championship. ...

Horoscopes

Everybody wants your attention on Monday and Tuesday. There’s no time left for you, but that’s OK. You’re quick, and if you look sharp to important people, you could get that promotion you’re after. Romance beckons on Wednesday and Thursday, but that may be as good as it gets. If making the connection with your sweetheart is difficult, just remember that absence makes the heart grow fonder. Your workload is intense on Friday and Saturday. The good news is that the money could be pouring into your pocket if you’re willing and able to produce the results. It may be Sunday before you have time for that conversation you’ve wanted to have. The good news? It goes very well then. Taurus (April 20-May 20) Do your budget on Monday and Tuesday. Clip coupons and figure out your menus for the week. If you play this game right, you could wind up with a profit. Pay attention to what’s going on at your house Wednesday and Thursday. Your partner could decide to make a few changes. Just make sure he or she doesn’t throw out your favorite sweater. Don’t take a disagreement with your sweetheart too seriously on Friday. If you put in the correction that’s being requested, on Saturday you two will be happier than ever. Go through the Sunday papers, with scissors in hand. You could make even more next week. Gemini (May 21-June 21) There’s plenty of money on Monday and Tuesday, but don’t spend it all. Pay yourself first by sending a good-sized chunk to your retirement account. A new idea you’re trying out at work could fall flat on Wednesday and Thursday. Practice before showing off and use a safety net. A perfectionist, possibly somebody who lives with you, wants to tell you what to do on Friday and Saturday. This is going to be good advice, so take notes. Save Sunday for your sweetie. A long walk or a drive in the country and a meaningful conversation sweep the week’s worries right out of your head. Cancer (June 22-July 22) You’re liable to win the argument Monday and Tuesday, with help from your friends. Take care of your teammates, not just yourself, and they’ll take care of you. You’d like to do everything for your loved ones on Wednesday and Thursday, but you can’t afford it. They’ll understand, eventually. Study to keep up with the competition on Friday and Saturday, and you could come out the winner again. A peaceful Sunday at home will be much appreciated. Read a good book. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Follow your hunches on Monday and Tuesday to set priorities. You have too much to do, so put first things first. You’re in the spotlight on Wednesday and Thursday. Don’t go too far out on a limb, or you could lose your balance. Friday’s good for getting more money if you also want a new job. Profit through your own efforts on Saturday and learn a new skill on Sunday. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You’re looking good on Monday and Tuesday. If you’re looking for love, a friend might want to upgrade then. The pressure’s intense on Wednesday and Thursday, partially due to breakdowns. If others can’t decide what they want, step in and do it for them. You and your sweetheart may have to take off in two different directions on Friday. That’s OK. Saturday’s better for making plans for the future, anyway. Go through your old coat pockets on Sunday and look under the couch cushions, too. Odds are good you’ll find something of value. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Be polite on Monday and Tuesday, even if it’s difficult. A moody older person could turn out to be a good friend, although at first it seems unlikely. Try not to have friends over to your place Thursday or Friday. They’d just complicate matters and interfere with your private time. Finish up old chores on Saturday. That will give you time on Sunday to play with your favorite people. Travel’s OK then, but don’t stay out late. Leave plenty of time for snuggling. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 21) Your intuition’s excellent on Monday and Tuesday. Use it regarding romance and to make your home more comfortable. Consider taking on more responsibility Wednesday and Thursday, but don’t sign anything yet. Find out what the job involves before you say you’ll do it. A visit with friends on Friday could go late, interfering with a private engagement. Better call, or you could get left out in the cold. You and your date have a great time Saturday, visiting friends together. But save time for contemplation and planning on Sunday. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Be practical on Monday and Tuesday. You might not have as much money as you thought, after you finish paying bills. You’re tempted to play hooky on Wednesday and Thursday, but that would be a big mistake. A co-worker would snitch! You want to be guiltless on Friday, anyway, when negotiating for more money. Launch your garage enterprise on Saturday and make a tidy profit. Gather with close friends and neighbors on Sunday. A potluck would be perfect. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Your partner’s in a snit on Monday or Tuesday, but that’s OK. You can work out a compromise and not give up what you want. Financial negotiations are full of surprises on Wednesday and Thursday. Be careful shopping then. All of the surprises are not pleasant. Travel might take you away from a loved one on Friday, but you can make up for it Saturday. Go wherever you’re going together then. Be respectful to an older person on Sunday, and you’ll profit from that interaction, too. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Do the work and make the money on Monday and Tuesday. You may have to figure out which work to do, but that’s OK. You can. Hassles with your partner mar Wednesday and Thursday. You won’t give an inch and neither will he or she, so let that deal ride for a while. Compromising will be easier later. Shop for the good deals on Friday and Saturday, and you’ll find them. This goes for household items and real estate. Travel and romance look lovely for Sunday. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) You are so cute on Monday and Tuesday; you’ll be irresistible. And, you’re so nice, that you’re putting others first. You’re a big winner, and so are they! The work is complex on Wednesday and Thursday. Don’t feel bad if some of it has to be done over; it’s probably not your fault. Proceed with caution, just to make sure. A temporary clash with a loved one on Friday is nothing to get upset about. By Saturday it’ll be forgotten or seem like a joke. You know all those friends you’ve been promising lunch? Have them all over on Sunday. Birthdays This Week Jan. 8: You’re full of good ideas, but your partner ensures your success. Competition energizes you. Jan. 9: You can’t do it all by yourself anymore. Find someone you can trust and share your precious plans. Jan. 10: Stash away as much as possible, just in case your team needs help. Your needs are simple — and getting simpler. Jan. 11: Stick to your budget, and a potential problem becomes a blessing. Search for buried treasure. Jan. 12: Work takes precedence, but don’t complain. If you keep your nose to the grindstone for a while, the vacation of your dreams could finally happen. Jan. 13: Dreams you’d almost given up on could come true. You’re persistent, and that’s the key. Jan. 14: You’ll have to follow the rules this year, even the ones you didn’t make. An expert leads you. ...

A compilation of meaningless awards with no logical order

Well, it’s that time of year again. With the new year beginning, every yahoo with a typewriter is cranking out a list of the best and worst of the past year. Since I didn’t want to be left out, I figured I’d come up with some awards of my own. I had originally planned to do these awards while drunk (they probably would have been a hell of a lot funnier), but since I passed out before I could get to a computer last night (that East Coast iced tea went house on my sober ass), I’m now trying to write these with a hangover, so bear with me. Without further ado, I now present the first-ever (and quite possibly the last-ever) Josh’s If-everyone-else-gets-to-make-up-stupid-year-in-review-awards-then-I’m-sure-as-hell-not-going-to-be-left-out Year in Review Awards. Man of the year: In my mind, this award can’t be given to a single person. I think that a pair of men have earned the right to be called the year’s best. That’s right, I’m talking about Adam Carolla and Jimmy Kimmel, the co-hosts of “”The Man Show.”” In this, their second season, these two men have taken chauvinism to new heights by continuing to bring us juggies and beer. Thank you men, from the bottom of my heart. Woman of the year: Despite my desire to thank Carmen Electra for not only coming to UCSD, but also for running half-naked through sprinklers in “”Scary Movie,”” I have to give this award up to Hillary Clinton. No woman has had a better year. Clinton is not only wrapping up her eighth year as president, but she was recently elected senator of New York and she also signed an $8 million book deal. On top of that, she appears to have kept Little Bill in check for the past year, as no new interns have come forward. You go, girl. Movie of the year: This award can go to none other than “”Gone in 60 Seconds.”” This movie had everything that a person could possibly want in a movie. It had fast cars, explosions and Angelina Jolie’s lips. For women, this movie also had a lot of drama. I’ve never seen so many men cry when Eleanor was crushed by the crane. For those of you that haven’t seen the movie, Eleanor is a 1967 Shelby GT 500 Mustang. It is a truly beautiful sight. Second-best movie of the year: I wasn’t going to give this award, but there was a movie out there that was truly deserving of it. This movie would have easily taken the movie of the year if “”Gone in 60 Seconds”” hadn’t been in the running. The picture that I speak of is “”Coyote Ugly.”” This movie had alcohol and women dancing on bars. Need I say more? Biggest loss of the year: While there have been plenty of significant deaths within the past year, none struck home as much as Joseph Calleja, who passed away at the tender age of 26. While many of you don’t recognize that name, you will most certainly recognize the name Joe C, which was his stage name when he performed with the likes of Kid Rock. Joe C’s guest raps on “”Devil Without a Cause”” were both hilarious and witty. We will all miss you, Joe. Biggest mistake of the year: Yes, I am talking about the election. How in the world did “”Dubya”” become our president? Reminiscent of Marion Barry, Dubya all but admitted to doing hard drugs (in this case, he snorted mass quantities of coke) and was still elected to office. We can only hope that the idiot of all idiots will surround himself with smart people so that we can survive for the next four years. God help us all. Worst invention of the year: This is undoubtedly the Chrysler PT Cruiser. This is the ugliest car known to man. It looks like a glorified hearse. What’s even more ridiculous about this car is the price that some people are paying for it. While the MSRP on the car is below $20,000, it has been sold for over $30,000. This is scary, considering that the car tested horribly in all aspects of crash testing. Please, stop buying this car. I beg of you. Please just die: Saddam Hussein, please just die. We are all tired of you. We thought that we were rid of you when Satan threw you into the depths of hell in the South Park movie. Alas, you have returned. We are ready for you to just die. Thank you. Best supporting actor: This promising young actor made a late surge in “”Cast Away.”” Wilson the volleyball was one of the most entertaining supporting actors in recent memory. He showed a true range of emotions in the dramatic role as the lone friend of Tom Hanks’ character on the deserted island. We can only hope that he will soon be appearing in more roles. Most disturbing trend: This award goes to the increased popularity of boy bands in the past year. While the phenomenon has threatened to break through in years past, it has hit the scene in full force this year. Groups like N*SYNC and the Backstreet Boys are more popular than ever. There was even a television special that turned five guys into a boy band on camera. This is a truly disturbing trend that we can only hope dies down in the year to come. Baby with the most potential to be one of “”People Magazine’s”” 50 most beautiful people: Ryan Philippe and Reese Witherspoon had a baby girl this year. With parents like that, she can’t help but turn into a beautiful woman. Congratulations to the new parents. Ryan, try to keep your sanity in 16 years when she starts to date. ...

Horoscopes

Aries (March 21-April 19) You’ll have a powerful urge to start your world cruise Monday, leaving the same-old, same-old behind. Unfortunately, if you’re not a pilot or ship’s captain, you could miss a great career opportunity. Marvelous riches could be yours on Wednesday, if you have the skills and do the work. Thursday and Friday you’ll more than double your output with an enthusiastic team. Saturday is for sports action, but as a participant, not a spectator. Save Sunday for prayer, contemplation and the overturning of new leaves. Taurus (April 20-May 20) If you’re a trader, be alert on Monday for excellent deals. Travel is appealing on Tuesday, but will go more smoothly if you wait until Wednesday. A confrontation is brewing on Thursday. If you’re smart, you’ll use it to your advantage. Hold out for what you’re worth on Friday, too. Expect an older person to be dictatorial on Saturday. If you’re thinking of giving money on Sunday, make sure you know how it will be spent. You might have to get involved to make sure the job’s done right. Gemini (May 21-June 21) The other guy’s going to win the argument on Monday. You might learn a lot by listening, though. Talk your sweetheart out of spending the rent on something else on Tuesday or Wednesday. If you don’t, you could find yourself in an awkward situation. On Thursday and Friday, love prevails in an unexpected way. If you’re going out, try a place you’ve never been. An exotic ambiance sparks romance. Cool it on Saturday and Sunday, however. This weekend is not a good time to do anything you don’t want to read about in the Sunday papers. Cancer (June 22-July 22) Manage your workload Monday, or you’ll never get it all done. You’ll have more help on Tuesday, but proceed with caution. It will take a day or so to divvy up the chores in a way that works for all. By Wednesday you should be clicking along in an efficient fashion. You’ll make up for lost time then. Watch your reserves on Thursday and Friday and plug leaks.. On Saturday a done deal could fall apart, so take care. Read all the fine print then, and on Sunday, too. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) An early date on Monday is best. Your workload increases later and gets downright hectic on Tuesday and Wednesday. You love the challenge, but it interferes with your social life. A partnership proves stimulating Thursday and Friday. Let the other person argue your case while you supply necessary information. A difference of opinion about money could mar your weekend — and your romantic relationship — if you’re not careful. Love’s more important, remember? Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Getting to work on time is hard on Monday. You’d rather stay home and take care of something more interesting. Don’t spend too much on romance or a child on Tuesday; you’ll regret it later. A long-distance connection proves quite beneficial on Wednesday. Apply new information and skills to streamline procedures at work Thursday. Ask for your reward on Friday. Don’t wait to cash the check, either. By Saturday conditions for your prosperity aren’t as favorable. Conversations with your mate are predicted for Sunday, but don’t take yourselves too seriously. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Something you discover on Monday could change everything. Don’t just sit there; go digging! Put your personal agenda on hold Tuesday and Wednesday. Thursday’s good for entertaining at home. Friendship could turn into romance as the evening progresses. Don’t discuss finances on your date Friday night. Venture farther than usual with your sweetheart and/or the kids on Saturday. You’re in for a pleasant surprise. Stick close to home on Sunday. Relax and make plans. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 21) Watch for bargains and valuables on Monday. That’s a good day to mine for gold. Then, put what you find into savings on Tuesday. Otherwise, it may slip through your fingers. An older woman’s comments could stir you up on Wednesday. Consider the consequences before taking action. Your mate or partner’s got the good advice on Thursday, so listen. Avoid a misunderstanding by being respectful on Friday. Things don’t go quite as planned at your house on Saturday. Focus on love, not money, Sunday, and you’ll wind up with plenty. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) You’re so creative Monday, you may surprise even yourself. Put your talent to good use on Tuesday and bring in much appreciated extra income. Turn down friends who have expensive tastes on Wednesday. Take on more work instead and have even more in your pockets by Thursday. A temporary upset sends you back to the drawing board Friday. Do more reading on your own time Saturday and find the answer to the riddle. Hide out at home on Sunday for a private conversation. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Information from private sources could be quite profitable Monday. You can find a bargain you might have missed otherwise. Don’t tell too much to a co-worker Tuesday or the boss on Wednesday. Wait until Thursday to take action, and you’ll scoot past the competition. This could work in love, as well as business. Schedule a shopping trip instead of a date on Friday, and Saturday’s good for earning a bonus. A conversation on Sunday could lead to a change in your perspective. Don’t be convinced of something that just ain’t so. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) A meeting is full of surprises on Monday. Your creativity is much appreciated, as you come up with an idea no one else considered. You’re under pressure Tuesday, from friends as well as family. Everybody wants your attention, and yet you have big deadlines to meet! Postpone a trip on Wednesday so you can get everything done. Don’t plan to go out on Thursday, either. You’ll most likely be exhausted by then. Stand up for yourself on Friday, and you’ll gain the boss’s respect. You’re the one leading the pack on Saturday, with your sparkling wit. Curtail your exuberance on Sunday. Don’t spend more than you have, even for a worthy cause. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Be flexible on Monday. The boss may feel like changing everything. Get together with your group on Tuesday and Wednesday to figure out how to do what is required. You may not come up with a plan until Thursday, but that’s fine. If you wait that long, you’re more likely to succeed. A lot’s going on behind closed doors on Friday. If you wait until Saturday, telling truth from fiction will be easier. Don’t let yourself be pressured on Sunday. If another person’s suggestion doesn’t feel right, don’t do it. Birthdays This Week Nov. 27: A keen competitor keeps you on your toes and sharpens your wits. You’ll thank this person later for helping you get your act together. Nov. 28: Shortages inspire your budget. They could inspire creativity and a group effort, as well. Be flexible. Nov. 29: You should do well this year through work, not luck. Clean up your lifestyle, and you’ll be much happier, too. Nov. 30: This year you’re practical and scholarly. You’ll earn more if you spend more on your own education. It’s deductible! Dec. 1: Study technical material and become a whiz. Even if you’ve been all thumbs before, it all starts making sense. Dec. 2: Set long-term goals. Include stuff you don’t know how to do yet. Dec. 3: This year learn to plan and to put in the corrections. And never take “”no”” for an answer. ...

A Day of Remembrance

Currently, over 34 million people around the world have HIV or AIDS. Additionally, 8,000 people worldwide die from AIDS every day, according to the World AIDS Day Web site, http://www.worldaidsday.org Sky Frostenson/ Guardian “”Figures like these make it seem like AIDS is winning,”” the site states. “”But all over the world, people like you are making a difference.”” World AIDS Day, one of the most effective events that takes place in hopes of making a difference against AIDS, is held annually on Dec. 1. The day is dedicated to educating people about HIV and AIDS and recognizing those individuals who have either died from the disease or are still living with it. The event continues to be the only coordinated international day of action against HIV and AIDS. The origins of World AIDS Day trace back to January of 1988, when the World Summit of Ministers of Health on Programs for AIDS Prevention made a request to open channels of communication, strengthen the exchange of experience and information, and forge a spirit of social tolerance. The organization wanted a more honest way of dealing with the newfound AIDS epidemic and has succeeded in this over the last 12 years. The proof is this: Since its inception, World AIDS Day has received the patronage of the United Nations and the World Health Assembly, as well as innumerable other countries, governments and individuals. Themes Throughout the Year World AIDS Day has a particular theme for each year. “”Communication”” was the theme for its first year in 1988. Since then, more specific themes have been developed. In 1999, the theme, “”Listen, Learn, Live: World AIDS Campaign with Children and Young People,”” stressed the importance of educating young adults on the dangers of AIDS. This year, the theme is “”AIDS: Men Make a Difference.”” According to the World AIDS Day Web site, over 70 percent of HIV infections worldwide occur through sex between men and women, and a further 10 percent through sex between men. Additionally, another 5 percent occur among people who inject drugs, 80 percent of whom are men. The World AIDS Day campaign hopes that by bringing attention to men’s roles in infection, awareness will be increased and, they feel, this may be the surest way to fight the AIDS epidemic. Student Health Advocates World AIDS Day will be observed at UCSD on Thursday. The event is being coordinated by Debbie Pino-Saballett, the outreach coordinator for Student Health Services. “”It’s such an important event and virtually every student knows somebody who has been affected by HIV,”” Pino-Saballett said. “”It’s a way for them to take an hour to show their support for continued HIV research for those who have died as well as for those living with HIV.”” According to UCSD’s Student Health News, Student Health Advocates is a program that provides students with special training as clinic aides and peer educators. One of their many duties on campus is to provide sexual health information to the UCSD community. They accomplish this in various ways, including information sessions and programs on contraception and sexually transmitted disease prevention. Pino-Saballet feels that an event like World AIDS Day is extremely relevant to college students’ lives. “”For one thing, the majority of people affected by HIV are in the college-age population,”” Pino-Saballett said. “”The purpose of World AIDS Day is to acknowledge people who have died of AIDS and to increase awareness of HIV.”” UCSD Events UCSD’s events for World AIDS Day will be held in the Price Center and on Library Walk on Nov. 30. Pino-Saballett said the events will take place a day early because they feared that a later date would bring about a lower turnout. With finals so close, organizers felt that Thursday would be better than Friday to maximize student participation. Activities begin at 9 a.m., starting with the AIDS Quilt on the Price Center lawn. (In case of rain, this event will take place in Galleries A and B.) Students can view the quilt until 3 p.m. From 11 a.m. to noon in the Price Center plaza, there will be a panel of speakers who are infected with HIV. Students will hear testimonials from these speakers and have the opportunity to ask questions about AIDS and HIV. Those in attendance will also receive a free “”condom rose.”” From 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., there will be an HIV and AIDS resource fair on Library Walk. Students will be able to view art and poetry by children living with HIV. Temporary tattoos and free condom roses will also be available. Other events will take place throughout the week at the Cross Cultural Center. The art and poetry will be on display in the gallery. In addition, an HIV- and AIDS- related movie will be shown at the Cross Cultural Center on Nov. 30 from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. World AIDS Day is co-sponsored by the A.S. Council and is a joint program by the Cross Cultural Center, the Women’s Center, the AIDS Research Institute, Student Health Services and Student Health Advocates. For more information regarding World AIDS Day at UCSD, contact Student Health Services at (858) 534-8089 or go to its Web site, http://www.ucsd.edu/shs/ For more information on World AIDS Day in general, visit it’s Web site at http://www.worldaidsday.org/ ...

Horoscopes

Aries (March 21-April 19) The workload is heavy on Monday, but the party flag is flying by Tuesday. Your luck has just changed for the better, which should be obvious on Wednesday. Don’t get too rowdy that night, however. The headache you’d have on Thursday morning would be just awful. Watch for bargains and profitable opportunities late Thursday and Friday. Travel is forecast for this weekend. The only problem on Saturday is that you can’t take everybody with you. Your reaction to an unexpected event on Sunday lets you know you’re on the right path. Taurus (April 20-May 20) Get your lovin’ in early on Monday. The work pace picks up, and on Tuesday you’ll be racing at full speed with all the other rats. Avoid an attractive distraction on Wednesday. If you don’t watch where you’re going, you could run into something. Avoid a person who’s all talk and no action on Thursday, to save valuable time. Be flexible on Friday; it’s likely there’ll be a change in your plans. The urge to splurge will be hard to fight this weekend. Get a high-quality item after which you’ve long lusted, and your buyer’s remorse should be minimal. Gemini (May 21-June 21) Detailed work flows on Monday, so push yourself to get it all done. There’s a mess-up regarding a romantic appointment mid-Tuesday, but you’re in for a pleasant surprise later that evening. That would also be a good time for you to pop the question, if you have one to ask. Circumstances beyond your control could interfere with your love life on Wednesday. Just save up your money, and you’ll get a chance to spend it on Thursday. Collaborate closely with a co-worker Friday, and a difficult assignment will be fun. Do what your partner suggests on Saturday. That’s the partner you can trust completely, of course. Visiting friends together on Sunday should prove interesting. You might even want to take notes. Cancer (June 22-July 22) Remember to do the errands you promised on Monday, and you’ll be nicely rewarded. You’d like to sleep in on Tuesday, but your partner and/or your boss have other plans. Something needs to be done at home on Tuesday and Wednesday. If you don’t already know what it is, your roommate will be glad to tell you. By Thursday you’re ready for an outing, but it may be late before you can get away. It’ll be easier to get your chores done Friday, and then you can make a break for it. On Saturday the other person has the first serve, so take care. The more you aim to please on Sunday, the more likely you’ll win the game. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Shop for bargains on household items as much as you can on Monday. You might find the perfect thing at a great price on your lunch hour. If quality and style are more important to you than price, you can wait until Tuesday. If you and your mate can’t agree on Wednesday, stall. Odds are good you’ll find an alternative on Thursday that neither of you had considered. Don’t get depressed if a scheme you try Friday simply doesn’t work. It’s more complicated than that, so do more research and studying over the weekend. Save plenty of time for fun and games, too. Your favorite playmate has a few surprises in store for you. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You’re apt to be the one who finds the answer on Monday. Keep digging, your chances are better than anyone else’s. Financial rewards could be yours on Tuesday or Wednesday. The money’s a result of your willingness to get rid of something that’s cluttering up your private space. Something you find on Thursday could change the way you do your work. It might even change where you work, if necessary. Frustrations on Friday could have you checking the want ads. Don’t leave one paycheck before you have another one lined up. If you’re thinking of relocating, this weekend will be perfect. Or, just have a party at your place. Looks like there’s lots of chaos there anyway — might as well enjoy it. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) You could be faced with a load of overdue chores on Monday. Don’t panic, just take them one at a time. Put them in order of importance. Your energy level’s high through Tuesday and Wednesday, and you’re getting smarter. You’ll find that a task that was daunting before is starting to become almost easy. Don’t get cocky, though. Thursday and Friday are fraught with peril. You may even be too tired to go out on Friday night. Schedule your romantic interlude for Saturday instead. Choose a date who’s stimulating intellectually as well as otherwise, and you’ll have a weekend to write home about. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 21) A friend can help you make an important connection on Monday. Go ahead and ask for the favor. Knowing which button to push helps you find the resources you need on Tuesday and Wednesday. Pushing them takes tact, and perfect timing, both of which you have in abundance. A mess at home could throw you off stride on Thursday — temporarily. Stay alert; you’ll get another opportunity to score. Things are not as they appear to be on Friday. Don’t say much, you could find out later that you were talking to the wrong person. Saturday’s good for losing a wager, or spending too much at the stores. Ixnay on gambling, too. Sunday’s better for fixing up your place, but don’t stay up late. You’ll need your beauty sleep by then. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Don’t snap back at a critical older person on Monday. If you simply say, “”Yes, SIR!”” or ma’am, whichever the case may be, you’ll increase your profits instead of losing your job. Tell the whole story to your friends on Tuesday, and they’ll give you lots of sympathy. Don’t let them solve your problem for you on Wednesday, though. That would be too expensive. Let them inspire you, and maybe teach you how to do it yourself on Thursday. Keep a low profile on Friday. Listen instead of telling what you know, and you’ll discover an error before you make it. The ball’s in your court over the weekend. Partying with neighbors and siblings would be perfect. Don’t spread gossip you’ve recently heard, however. Check it out carefully by asking a friend who would know on Sunday. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Looks like the coast is clear on Monday if you want to try something slightly dangerous. Your friends will be glad to help, so you won’t be alone. If you’ve been keeping a secret, be ready to confess it on Tuesday or Wednesday. It’ll come out around then anyway, so if you mention it first, you’ll look better. Don’t bother to ask for a raise on Thursday or Friday. You’re more likely to get a cut in your pay, or lose a client. Some of the things you learn over the weekend could help you improve your income, though, so don’t worry about it. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) If you have all the facts and figures, you could benefit quite nicely on Monday. Don’t leave anything to chance. Travel’s appealing on Tuesday and Wednesday, but not a good idea. Take care of obligations instead. You’re likely to clash with an older person Wednesday night or Thursday. This person is saying your dreams are unrealistic. Don’t let that stop you. Dreams don’t have to be realistic anyway. Don’t hurt yourself by trying to push a square peg into a round hole on Friday. You’d be wise to play with a team, or bet on one, over the weekend. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Your partner’s got all the angles figured out on Monday, so just go along with the program. A long-distance contact on Tuesday could lead to a better job if you’re interested. If money’s tight on Tuesday, maybe it’s time to go looking. Don’t tell any work-related secrets on Wednesday, especially about the boss. He or she is apt to find out on Thursday or Friday, and would not be amused. Your priorities are constantly shifting this weekend, so stay flexible. An older person wants to take control, but may not have the route figured out quite yet. Give helpful hints. Birthdays This Week: Nov. 20: Priorities are changing. You’re growing from playing in the present to planning for the future. Nov. 21: Join friends in spiritual inquiry and find the balance you’ve sought. You’ll become more outspoken in the process. Nov. 22: Choose your friends carefully this year. They could lead you to great knowledge or into debt! Nov. 23: Old beliefs are challenged this year. Your studies lead to a deeper understanding and a stronger faith. Nov. 24: Can your dreams become reality? How about your fears? Through self-discipline, you’ll be the architect. Nov. 25: You’re awesome this year, but don’t get cocky. Play by the rules, and the world will benefit from your wisdom. Nov. 26: You’re growing so fast your friends hardly recognize you. You were already cheerful and lucky. Now you’re becoming practical, too. ...

The Editor's Soapbox

There is an old saying that goes something like this: “”A society can be judged on the basis of how it treats its prisoners.”” I happen to think this is true in many respects. However, since I have been at college I have come to my own alternate conclusion regarding criteria for judging our society: e-mail. Before I go on, I feel it is only fair that I mention that I am a copy editor here at the Guardian, and in the media world, copy editors are notorious for being nitpicking, unreasonably anal grammarmongers. That being said, I shall now continue. I am now in my fourth year at UCSD, and I began using e-mail on a regular basis my first year here. Since then, I have become thoroughly disgusted with what I encounter each time I wearily sit down at my computer and reluctantly check my Microsoft Outlook inbox. Now, I’m not one to brag, but I usually have somewhere in the range of 10 to 15 e-mails waiting for me when I check at the end of the day. Aside from the junk mail, there are invariably two or three messages that just make me cringe. For some reason, many young people seem to think that the rules of the English language don’t apply when it comes to electronic mail. I say “”young people,”” because when I get messages from my parents or older relatives, they are usually composed of complete sentences, paragraphs, and even some capital letters appropriately placed here and there. I think I know a couple of people who have yet to touch the shift button on their keyboard while writing me an e-mail. UCSD is supposed to have pretty sharp individuals studying here, but I have gotten some e-mail “”messages”” from these people that should constitute basis for their demotion back to first grade. The next time I get an e-mail along the lines of “”yo bring that cd tomorrow you know the won i lent you this wknd alrite then thanx ;-D.”” I’m going to lose it. There is one notable exception to my wrath: the drunken e-mail. I actually think those are pretty funny. I know what you’re thinking, but I am not a total freak. I am just special and unique — at least that’s what my mom told me. I don’t have any problems with the occasional typo in a quickly written e-mail. I don’t even really have a problem with the fact that not everyone knows the difference between “”accept”” and “”except.”” These can get a little tricky in the middle of the night, which is when a good amount of the e-mail I get is created. What I do have a problem with is “”emoticons.”” Emoticons are those short strings of punctuation made to look like faces. Every time I see one of those little pieces of crap, I get the gag reflex. First of all, every lame punctuation face I have ever seen has to be looked at sideways. Second, they are so disgustingly cutesy, their use should be reserved for schoolgirls of junior-high age and younger. If you cannot express your thoughts and emotions in a typed message without resorting to gross punctuation misuse, you have some serious problems. I also take issue with “”LOL,”” which apparently signifies “”laughing out loud.”” If you actually had to type that, it probably wasn’t that funny. Also … I don’t think any form of writing abuses the elipsis mark more than the e-mail. Now, I do realize that a lot of these bad e-mail habits come from using programs such as Instant Messenger and ICQ. Actually, besides their negative impact on e-mail style and social lives, I have no problem with these programs. Because of the instantaneous nature of this type of chatting, it is fine to try to go as fast as you can, and if you’re a slow typist, using things like “”LOL”” and emoticons can help you get your point across quickly. However, this is not the nature of e-mail. E-mail to me is exactly like a letter, just sent electronically as opposed to via U.S. postal services. It is almost as if “”e-mail”” is short for “”electronic mail.”” Before the Internet, when people actually sent letters to each other through the mail, I doubt they drew little emoticons after every sentence. They actually took some time to make sure their letters were worth reading. What I think many students don’t understand is that their e-mails actually reflect on them. I can say that I have better impressions of people who send me well-written messages. I know not everyone judges others on the basis of their grammar skills like I do, but I’m sure most people, if only subconsciously, actually do consider horrible e-mailers with less esteem. It is hard, at least for me, to take someone seriously who sends me sideways, buck-toothed, winking smiley faces. I seriously doubt they were actually making those faces while they were writing. Then again, I’m also against those “”Visualize Whirled Peas”” bumper stickers. ...

Fighting the Sandman

When Muir senior Roshani Patel wakes up every morning, she makes herself a cup of coffee before heading to campus. Patel, like millions of other people, has grown accustomed to daily caffeine consumption. Coffee, soda and caffeine pills have become increasingly popular among students, helping them to stay alert. According to the International Food Information Council, caffeine, which is part of a group of compounds known as methylxanthines, is a substance that is found in the leaves, seeds and fruits of at least 63 plant species throughout the world. Common sources of caffeine include coffee, cocoa beans, kola nuts and tea leaves. Depending on the amount consumed, caffeine can act as a mild stimulant to the central nervous system. According to the American Medical Association, over 80 percent of adults in the United States consume some form of caffeine. The AMA study also states that each day, the average adult ingests approximately 280 milligrams of caffeine, the amount found in about two large cups of coffee. This “”coffee craze”” is common among people of all ages, and Patel is no exception. “”On average, I drink about five to six cups of coffee per day,”” Patel said. “”The caffeine helps me to wake up in the morning, and allows me to function throughout the day without getting tired.”” While overall consumption of caffeinated beverages has increased over the years, studies have shown that the drug, if taken in small amounts, is not harmful. Roland Griffiths of Johns Hopkins School of Medicine confirmed that relatively small doses of caffeine might have positive effects. “”People who take in small amounts of caffeine say that they feel more awake and alert,”” Griffiths said. “”In higher doses, however, caffeine can produce negative effects, such as anxiety and nervousness.”” So, how much caffeine is too much? The Food and Drug Administration suggests that people who consume large amounts of coffee (more than five cups a day) on a regular basis often find that their bodies have adapted to the constant amount of caffeine, thereby increasing their tolerance to the substance. An increase in caffeine intake then becomes necessary in order to create a stimulating effect. Those who are dependent on the consumption of a certain amount of caffeine, and who go without the substance for some time, may suffer from withdrawal symptoms such as fatigue and headaches. The physical and psychological dependence on the drug can also lead to irritability. Griffiths warns that the substance can be addictive and can lead to mild side effects. He refers to caffeine as the world’s most widely used “”mind-altering drug.”” Patel has experienced some of the side effects of caffeine consumption. “”I have been drinking coffee since I was 14 years old, and over the years I have increased the amount of caffeine that I am able to consume,”” she said. “”I am so used to having a certain amount of caffeine each day that if I go without it, even for a few hours, I get headaches.”” Regular caffeine consumers often overlook all of these factors. The IFIC states that approximately 110 million Americans drink coffee on a daily basis. A large percentage of this figure includes those who are between the ages of 18 and 24. Although caffeinated drinks are popular among people of all ages, college students have been shown to rely on stimulants such as caffeine pills in order to increase their alertness. One such pill is Vivarin, a FDA-approved, over-the-counter product. Many college students rely on this pill to restore their mental alertness. Several studies have determined that students tend to use caffeine pills to stay up late, especially during midterms and final exams. Students have also been known to use these stimulants to increase their attentiveness during the day. Patel, a self-proclaimed coffee addict, often relies on caffeine pills such as Vivarin to increase her energy. “”Sometimes the caffeine in coffee and soda does not keep me up,”” Patel said. “”Caffeine pills such as Vivarin often succeed in making me more alert, even when drinking caffeinated beverages doesn’t.”” College students contribute a large portion of sales for companies such as Vivarin. Use among students is so widespread that Vivarin claims that over 40 percent of college students have tried a caffeine pill at least once in their lifetime. Vivarin, as well as similar drugs such as No Doz, caters most of its marketing plans toward young adults, since the market for the pills includes mostly college-age people. Like Patel, Revelle junior Tanmai Saxena has used the Vivarin pill several times in order to increase his alertness. “”The amount of caffeine in a Vivarin pill is equivalent to about two cups of coffee,”” Saxena said. “”I have taken Vivarin several times in the past in order to maximize my efficiency in terms of being able to stay up late to study.”” In 1997, The Center for Science in the Public Interest successfully urged the FDA to encourage manufacturers of soft drinks, as well as other products containing caffeine, to properly label their products. The CSPI claimed that consumers have a right to know the amount of caffeine in the products they purchase. Recently, a number of studies on the potential dangers of increased caffeine use have been conducted. In 1999, Consumer Reports on Health conducted a study of these dangers. The study found that an unusual dose of caffeine can raise blood pressure levels temporarily, and if occurring during stressful periods, can be dangerous to people with hypertension. The study also concluded that those who experience irregular heartbeats should eliminate caffeine from their diets. Also, those who suffer from anxiety problems should avoid caffeine use since large doses of the substance can trigger panic attacks. Finally, it was concluded that insomnia and emotional distress were effects of long-term use of the drug. Despite the apparent side effects of excess caffeine consumption, most students feel that the substance increases alertness and decreases drowsiness. Many claim that the increase in energy they experience is worth the few minor consequences of caffeine use. Patel admits to her dependency on caffeine, but insists that if it were not for her daily cups of coffee, she would be unable to function with the same amount of energy. “”Am I addicted? Of course,”” Patel said. “”But old habits are hard to break.”” ...

The Editor's Soapbox

Tuesday evening started out as every other Tuesday does. I went to my three classes and then stopped by the Guardian to see how everything was looking. Everything after that point, however, was far from ordinary. I am sure by this point everybody has been informed about what transpired on Tuesday night and Wednesday morning. What isn’t as well known is the ramifications of the events. When looked at in retrospect, Nov. 7 raised two very poignant questions that will have to be answered before the next presidential election. First of all, there is the question of the media’s erroneous reporting. I have had a few quarters of statistics and econometrics, so I understand how the media use samples to predict the winner in specific states. If the sample is large enough, it is possible to run studies where you can be all but sure about the overall results. This is not what I have a problem with. The problem I have is how they factor in previous results into their prognostication. In a nutshell, what they are doing is using previous results and comparing them to the results that they get from their exit polls, and making a prediction based on those numbers. Theoretically, this would be a good practice, but the problem is that populations in certain areas change drastically between elections. Take Florida, the primary contentious state for this election, for example. Florida’s population is growing at one of the fastest rates of any state in the union. Also, the makeup of the different counties in Florida has been altered greatly of late. This caused the media a great many problems because they assumed that they were polling a representative sample of last election’s voting population in each county of Florida. This turned out to be far from true, and the inaccuracy of their polls caused them to call Florida for Vice President Al Gore way before they should have. This problem only caused confusion among the American population and may have changed the voting patterns of people in states other than Florida. I figured the race was over when Florida was given to Gore, and if I hadn’t already voted I may have decided to stay home rather then waste my time on a hopeless cause. If there were enough people like me in the Western states, this mistake by the media may have altered the results of the election. Even though this mistake seems extraordinarily unprofessional and damaging to the electoral process, the media made another mistake Tuesday night that may have been even more damaging. The media is not allowed to announce their predictions for a particular state before all the polls in that state are closed. Florida was announced for Gore after most of the state’s polls were closed, however there was a section that was still accepting votes. The panhandle of Florida is in the Central time zone, and its polls closed an hour after the majority of Florida’s polls. As a result, prospective voters in Florida’s panhandle region saw that Florida had gone to Gore, and consequently, many of the voters that were going to vote for Bush may have stayed home rather than voting. Therefore, as a result of the media’s wrongful announcements, the legitimacy of Florida’s vote count may have been jeopardized. CNN and NBC had better hope Bush wins, or they may have serious lawsuits on their hands. The other problem that was revealed by the events of election 2000 revolves around the possible discrepancy between the popular vote and the electoral vote counts. Although it isn’t a sure thing yet, it appears as though Bush is going to win the electoral vote and the election, while losing the popular vote to Gore. Although reports that this will cause upheaval throughout the nation and lock the president-elect in endless red tape are erroneous, this discrepancy does beg the question of whether the electoral college is consistent with democratic ideals. How can the will of the people be thwarted in this way? How can the majority of the people vote for one candidate while another one is chosen? The answer to these questions is simple: This is our system. It was originally set up because a national election was not feasible in the 18th and early 19th centuries, so people voted for a delegate and that delegate voted for the president. Many people argue that with the Internet and altogether improved communications networks, a popular vote would be optimum. The 2000 election has affirmed that belief for many people. The problem is that the electoral college now functions to protect the rights of smaller states. Alaska and South Dakota would never receive any concessions in a popular vote because of their relatively small populations. But because they each have three electoral votes, which are actually much more than representative of their population relative to the rest of the country, they are visited by the candidates and given promises if they elect that candidate. When this is considered, a switch to a pure popular vote may not be the best path for the entire country. What should be done? Got me! All I know is that we are now aware of the problem and can no longer consider these problems hypothetical and ignore them. This election has made them all too real and put them in the forefront of our minds. Something must be done about the media and the issue of the electoral college must be addressed before the next election so these problems don’t manifest themselves again. ...