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Long-form investigative articles covering people, events and issues that affect the student body. If you have an idea for us to cover, contact us at [email protected]

Loan Acceptance Rising With Upped Enrollment

LONG BEACH, Calif. — With more students enrolling in universities, more students are turning to student loans to help pay for college. “”There has been a definite surge in terms of the people who are going to school,”” said Molly Sullivan, a spokesperson for college financier Sallie Mae. “”That of course increases the number of people taking out loans for education.”” In 1970 there were an estimated 8.6 million students enrolled at the university level. Today there are 16.7 million students, an increase of 94 percent. Outstanding debt on college loans in 1999 totaled $178 billion, Sullivan said. The average amount owed on Stafford Loans, according to the U.S. Department of Education, in 1995-1996 for undergraduates completing their educations at public universities was $11,950. At a private university that amount rises to $14,290. For those who continue on to get a master’s degree, those numbers jump to $15,000 for a public college and $21,410 at a private college. Recently, California State University at Long Beach students borrowed an average of $6,200 by the time they graduated in the 2000-01 academic year, according to Financial Aid Director Dean Kulju. Students at CSULB could qualify for up to three types of loans to pay for their college education depending on their need: the Stafford Loan, a work-study loan and the Perkins Loan. The Stafford Loan can be disbursed to any student wanting assistance for college. “”Basically it is a federally sponsored loan program where there are two categories, subsidized and unsubsidized,”” Kulju said. “”Subsidized meaning while the student is in school, the interest is paid on their behalf by the government, that is if the student has financial need.”” The government will continue to pay for the interest for a six-month grace period after the student either graduates or withdraws from school. “”The unsubsidized loan is for a student that does not have the financial need,”” Kulju said. “”While the student is in school they are responsible for the interest.”” Under the Stafford Loan, an undergraduate student can borrow up to $46,000 for school, but can only have $23,000 subsidized, Kulju said. Work-study loans are also allocated to CSULB, Kulju said. The $1 million amount given to CSULB is only enough to where 600 students participate in the loan program due to their financial need. Students will work to pay off their loans while in school. A Perkins Loan is also allocated to CSULB, and a maximum of $1,500 can be given to students who qualify per academic year. “”The Perkins Loan is a good program because it is a fixed interest rate whereas the Stafford Loan is a variable rate,”” Kulju said. The Perkins Loan rate is fixed at 5 percent and students are given a nine-month grace period to begin repaying the loans. Kulju said that the loan could also be deferred or canceled if you become a police officer or teacher, for example. This loan is also being done through the campus instead of a bank, as with the Stafford Loan. With an increase in the amount of loans given to students, the U.S. Department of Education last tear released a report called “”Debt Burden Four Years After College”” on the burden student loans had on bachelor’s degree recipients from 1992-1993, and how the loans are affecting them four years later. The study found that half of those who received bachelor’s degrees in 1992-93 borrowed money to help pay for school, owing an average of $10,142. Of those that moved on to graduate education, 28 percent continued to receive loans for school. Undergraduates who did not further their education owed an average of $7,100, left paying an average of $151 per month. Those who continued on to earn a master’s degree owed $17,200, paying an average of $246 per month. Only 16 percent of all borrowers from 1992-1993 were able to pay off or have their loans forgiven by 1997. In 1992 the Reauthorization of Higher Education Act raised the loan limits. This group of students being studied would not benefit from the changes in the borrowing laws. The total amount of money borrowed that year was $17.2 billion. That amount would increase 38 percent to $23.8 billion a year later. When students either graduate or withdraw from college, they can choose many types of options to repay their loans. “”One of the common [plans] would be over a 20-year span and they would divide the payments up over that span,”” said Joshua Henry, information specialist for the Federal Student Aid Information Center At Sallie Mae, the average time of repayment is lower. “”The typical [repayment] term is done in 10 years,”” Sullivan said. “”But we have various repayment options depending on what is in the best interest for each borrower.”” Henry said that there is also a different type of plan called an Income Contingent Repayment Plan. “”That is where you send in some sort of documentation as to how much you make and your repayment will be based on that, instead of putting all the payments in a certain time period,”” she said. “”After 30 years, if you still owe money on that student loan, because of regulation of the government, you don’t have to pay anymore on it.”” Students can also consolidate their loans to simplify their loan repayments. The interest rate will never exceed 8.25 percent by law. Loans can be consolidated during the grace period, once a student enters repayment or during deferment or forbearance periods. A lender cannot refuse to consolidate a loan due to the number or types of loans, the school attended, the interest rate borrowers would be charged, or the different types of repayment schedules available to them. — Daily Forty-Niner ...

Friend's Sudden Move to the Straight and Narrow Causes Disappointment

A few days ago, I felt an urgent need to contact a high school friend with whom I had not spoken in at least two years. As I tried to compose a friendly greeting to type into the instant messenger’s empty dialogue box, I vaguely began recalling the details of her life as I last knew them. I could remember a handful of lifetime turning points that I knew she had hit during our years without contact. I couldn’t wait to hear what paths she had paved for herself, and which bridges she had burned along the way. After transferring to San Francisco State University from my hometown’s community college, my friend sent me a brief e-mail two years ago describing how she met a man who was sweeping her off her feet — all the way to Ireland. According to the note, she was head-over-heels for her soul mate, and she would be settling in Ireland for an indefinite amount of time to remain a part of his life. She didn’t think twice about putting school on hiatus, or about disappearing in Europe with someone she had known for only a month or so. She was one of my most carefree companions. Her life was shamelessly novelesque, and I wanted the juicy update that I knew she would happily hand over. As I typed my lame but trustworthy greeting, “”Hey — it’s been a while,”” into the dialogue box, I had no idea what to expect from her. I admit that perhaps that is what I always relied on her for — a fast-paced, impulsive lifestyle of which I was a part only because I was a part of her. It was always a win-win situation — I remained safely guarded from the consequences of such a lifestyle by surviving solely on the meat of her stories, rather than enjoying the fruit of such adventures firsthand. Call me bland, but I decided to move meticulously after suffering through a few bad choices of my own. When I met her during my freshman year of high school, I was an awkward and shy 14-year-old with more lust for the nonconformist, pulp fiction life she led than my timid nature would ever allow me to embody. She was one of the best storytellers I had been lucky enough to listen to, for one key reason: Her spark and flair were genuine. Everything from the attempted overdose at 13 to the seminude photos she posed for at 16 were documentable events that she never admitted to thinking twice about, but which she laughed about on many occasions. Enthralling me from the start with such stories, I faithfully listened to my friend throughout high school. I listened to the details of an inexplicable divorce that she refused to let scar her, I listened to the makings and breakings of several flings with the boys who drove too fast and did too many drugs and invariably failed to keep my friend entertained. I listened to her laugh at her mother’s reaction to her tattoo and piercings, and I listened painstakingly when her jaw was wired shut after her dentist recommended that she have her jaw broken and realigned. I listened to her scoff at those who badmouthed her for getting her nose “”realigned”” while she was already under the knife for the jaw procedure. I listened to her dreams and goals of being an erotic dancer, a child therapist, a photographer, and a counterculture-loving San Franciscan. Meanwhile, I was going to class from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. I was putting in time with yearbook and student government and volunteer-needy retirement homes. I was meeting my A through F requirements. I was taking my Advanced Placement courses. I was not living or dreaming outside the box like she always had been — I was happy just listening to the live version of her oral history. Needless to say, when I messaged my friend the other day, I was feeling those old, stinging hunger pains that gnawed at me throughout high school — my almost voyeuristic thirst for the latest chronicles. Until last month, I’d been reading about the media, welfare laws, and campaign finance reform all year — no wonder I was drooling for the next chapter of her racy saga. Racy, however, the next chapter was not. My friend, after replying to my greeting with excitement, quickly reported that she recently found God through Christian worship, she had learned to speak in tongues and heal people through the power of touch, and that overall she had experienced a complete “”reformation.”” Well, I can’t accuse her of letting time turn her into a bore. I grimaced as I watched her text pop onto the screen. What was difficult for me to swallow was not that she is Christian now. Rather, the devil was in the details of her story. She described a weeklong religious retreat at which the thick presence of God at a three-hour prayer session inspired her to wail aloud, roll across the floor and to speak in tongues — or babble in baby talk, depending on your stance. She also described how a woman suffering an injured ankle was called to the stage. My friend then felt the urge to touch the wounded limb, and when she did, the sufferer was healed. Healed! My friend has changed. She is now the textbook stereotype of the prophecy-spouting religious fanatic — she told me that my house, because it was built in 1908, might have demons and must be anointed as soon as possible. She also believes premarital sex is a sin, that drugs are equivalent to Eve’s apple, and that the Bible should be read literally — and of course, those who don’t treat it as such will rot in Hades. She is someone I never would have opened myself to, someone I don’t find intellectually unique, someone I would never wait and wait to hear from. Now, I’m struggling to reconcile her two identities, to make sense of who she was versus who she is. I have no idea how I am going to find closure to my love affair with her life. I was trying to maintain ties, expecting that things would be as they once were, but time, space and religion just won’t let me preserve my moment. I feel as if I’ve been dumped. Yet, the more I mourn, the more I realize that this is what happens to high school friendships once you move away to college. This is life. ...

Making The Cut

Graduate and professional school present testing hurdles even higher than those the SAT presented high school students. Curricula vary among colleges and universities, so admission officers look at graduate examination scores as another way of choosing possible candidates for their schools. Kenrick Leung Guardian This creates a great need for tutoring and test preparation to boost test scores. The test preparation market is growing and diversifying, reflecting the demand of college students with different levels of tutoring. Though tests are crucial to the admissions process, other qualifications, such as undergraduate GPA, course load and extracurricular activities are taken into account. Nevertheless, what makes testing so valuable is the level playing field and common measure it creates for all applicants. Rather than having one exam that is taken by all students, graduate schools require different tests depending on what potential students wish to study. Each test is separate from the others and has different time lengths and questions. Some tests require using computers, while others still require a No. 2 pencil. With all the tests around, here is a look into the major tests available and how to best prepare for a graduate admissions test. Graduate Record Exam (GRE) Three sections: verbal (30 minutes, 30 questions), qualitative (45 minutes, 28 questions), analytical (60 minutes, 35 questions). Scoring: Each section is scored from 200 to 800. Average: 470 (verbal), 570 (quantitative), 540 (analytical). Almost all masters and doctoral programs require the GRE, therefore it is not necessarily related to any particular field of study. Financial aid and grants are also determined using GRE scores. The verbal section measures ability to comprehend and analyze written materials. The qualitative section determines elementary mathematical concepts, and the analytical section looks at relationships among sets of information and it tests logical thinking. The GRE is a computer adaptive test, which means that instead of filling in the bubbles, a computer scores questions. This is important as computer adaptive tests force the test taker to answer questions according to what he has already answered. If a question is answered correctly, the next question gets more difficult. The opposite occurs when an answer is incorrect. In addition to the GRE, subject tests and a writing assessment are also available. Each school has different requirements for which tests its applicants must take. Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) Two sections and two essays: analytical writing assessment (60 minutes, two essays), verbal (75 minutes, 41 questions), quantitative (75 minutes, 37 questions). Sections have subscore ranges of 0 to 60. Writing assessment ranges from 0 to 6. Average: 500 Business school candidates must take the GMAT, which tests general academic ability, but not business knowledge. A great score won’t necessarily get you into the school of your choice, but a low score could keep you out. Note that the GMAT is a computer adaptive test, making it easy to take the test anytime and anywhere. Law School Admission Test (LSAT) Five sections and one essay: two logical reasoning (35 minutes, 24-26 questions each), logic games (35 minutes, 23-24 questions), reading comprehension (35 minutes, 26-28 questions), experimental (35 minutes, 24-28 questions), writing sample (30 minutes). Scoring: Overall scores range from 120 to 180. Average: 150 The LSAT is different than other tests because it does not test verbal and mathematical ability, instead testing logical and analytical thinking. LSAT questions emphasize quick, complex reasoning. Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) Three sections and two essays: verbal reasoning (85 minutes, 65 questions), physical sciences (100 minutes, 77 questions), writing sample (60 minutes, two essays), biological sciences (100 minutes, 77 questions). Scoring: Scores from each section range from 1 to 15 and writing sample scores range from “”J”” to “”T,”” with “”T”” being the highest. Average: 8 for each section; writing sample average is “”N.”” Medical schools require this rigorous and intensive test that often lasts longer than six hours with breaks. The MCAT tests critical and verbal skills as well as numerous scientific concepts. While the LSAT does not generally follow formulas, the MCAT is heavy in memorization, requiring a basic knowledge of general and organic chemistry, physics and biology. Test preparation courses One of the most common and effective ways students prepare for their admission examinations is to take a test preparation course such as those offered by Princeton Review and Kaplan. These companies’ classes cover the basics of each test and proctor mock exams. Many students find the courses helpful because they organize key concepts and provide review sessions for all materials covered. Most courses consist of several classes that go over the various sections and essay portions of the test. Students learn how to approach individual questions as well as overall test-taking techniques. To reinforce these ideas, mock exams are given under regular test-taking conditions. For applicants who need more structured test preparation, well-scheduled courses offer a systematic timeline. Many students consider these classes essential to boosting their scores. These classes are also convenient and flexible, as many companies provide a multitude of possible time slots. Course lengths vary by the type of test taken, but most last about 10 weeks. Courses cost from $500 for quick reviews to more than $4,000 for personalized, private sessions. The average fee for a regular course hovers around $1,000. Critics of admissions tests often argue that these tests allow only those who can afford prep classes to achieve high scores, leaving those who cannot afford expensive tutoring behind. The Career Services Center recommends doing research to find the best course offered and warns against choosing the first course available. Reading your way to the top If the idea of spending 10 weeks or at least $1,000 for preparation sounds too intense or extreme, another option is to self-learn through the numerous graduate test preparation books that are available. Many of the companies that provide courses also sell books that closely represent what is taught by instructors. Besides Kaplan and the Princeton Review, other companies such as Peterson, Arco, and Barron’s offer guides for virtually every test out there. Although an instructor is not there to discuss problems, the convenience and flexibility of reading a book help in preparation for the admissions tests. However, be wary of using books to study for computer adapted tests. Reading a book can never recreate the feeling of taking a test by computer. There are many books and many ways of approaching the tests, but the best one is the one you are most comfortable using. When looking for books to use, make sure sample exams are included. These sample exams replace the mock exams used in preparation courses. On-campus help The Career Services Center offers help for students needing more information for graduate tests. Students can pick up informational bulletins, which have details on price, location and times of exams. Besides having flyers, the center also offers test-taking tips and techniques. Addresses and locations of test preparation services are also available. Although the Career Services Center does not say which courses are most effective, an applicant should look for several things in a test preparation course: What are the costs? What are the qualifications of the instructors? How long does the course last? If you aren’t satisfied with your scores, can you take the class again for free? For more information, contact the Career Services Center’s Professional and Graduate School Opportunities Program at (858) 534-4939. The center’s Web site, http://career.ucsd.edu is also helpful for learning more about graduate admissions tests. For those who decide to attend graduate or professional school, admissions tests conjure up old memories of the SAT or ACT. However, with preparation and knowledge of what may appear on the test, graduate school examinations can be much easier. ...

Get Into the Summer Music Festivities

Awww, the dog days of summer! For many people, summer means frozen lemonade, sunburns and Lollapalooza. Oh wait, that was so six years ago. At least you can still catch the lovely ladies of Lilith Fair. Oops, my mistake. That ended about three years ago. Hey, there is always the This Ain’t No Picnic festival. Actually, all you indie rock kids will have to find something else for this Fourth of July, because that’s out of the picture, too. OK, so the summer festival circuit is not what it once was, but there are still some shows making their way across the country this summer just in time for you to spend your hard-earned cash on overpriced T-shirts. Area:One The festival will feature Moby, Outkast, Paul Oakenfold, Incubus, New Order, The Roots, Nelly Furtado, Carl Cox, The Orb and Rinocerose. Stepping in where Lollapalooza left off, Area:One is a festival dedicated to artistic unity and integrity. However, at the festival’s Web site, http://www.areafestival.com, you will find one inherent difference between Area:One and its alternative predecessors. But never fear, you corporate-phobes, part of the proceeds from Area:One will benefit Greenpeace and Lifebeat. July 31: Mountain View, Calif. Shoreline Amphitheater. On sale now. Aug. 5: Devore, Calif. Blockbuster Pavilion. On sale now. Ozzfest Back from the dead, Marilyn Manson will join Black Sabbath, Slipknot, Papa Roach, Linkin Park and Crazy Town for this year’s Ozzfest. Unlike Area:One, this year’s lineup pays little attention to artistic integrity — Crazy Town is in the lineup — but nevertheless promises to rock as hard as ever. A warning to metalheads planning on going to the San Bernardino show: Leave at least three extra hours of travel time to get to the Blockbuster Pavilion, because the venue’s only access is from one freeway exit; and traffic piles up for miles. June 27: Sacramento, Calif. Sacramento Valley Amphitheater. On sale now. June 29: Mountain View, Calif. Shoreline Amphitheater. On sale now. June 30: San Bernardino, Calif. Glen Helen Blockbuster Amphitheater. On sale now. Vans Warped Tour If one thing can be counted on this summer, it is as always the Vans Warped Tour. Serving up another great collection of California punk, it never fails to deliver. Rancid, 311, Pennywise, NewFound Glory and Less Than Jake are just some of the bands you will find among the many athletes and artisans and the Warped Tour. June 24: Fresno, Calif. Fresno State Ampitheater. June 27: Chula Vista, Calif. Coors Amphitheater. On sale now. June 28: Ventura, Calif. Seaside Park. On sale now. June 29: Los Angeles, Calif. L.A. Coliseum. On sale now. If none of these tours are to your liking, I suggest taking off to merry ol’ England, where they really know how to throw concert festivals, for the annual Reading Festival. Travis, P.J. Harvey, Green Day and Iggy Pop are just a few of the big names you’ll find at the three-day concert. However, if you must spend the summer on this side of the Atlantic, there is still something to be learned from the Brits — beer improves every concert experience! ...

Last Words from the Guardian Seniors

Over the last three years, I have noticed that the final articles from outgoing editors are used primarily for three purposes: to give advice, to thank family and friends, and to reflect on events that have happened to the writers throughout their years at UCSD. After thinking about how I would use mine, I decided to do all three. My advice for the students of this school who are not yet in my position is simple, and it’s advice that you have heard from me many times throughout the last three years. It is simply this: You are responsible for your own happiness, so take that responsibility. It is indeed true that our school is somewhat socially challenged. It is also true that, unless you work hard at it, finding a good time can be very elusive. But to those of you who say that it is impossible to have a good time here, I say, “”Get a life.”” A famous comedian said it best: “”If you can’t find something to do, then you aren’t bored, you are boring.”” This couldn’t be more true. Entertainment doesn’t simply fall out of the sky. There are a lot of times that you have to make your own fun. That’s hard to do when you’re studying constantly or going home every weekend. I am a management science major, so I often put it in terms of economics. If you can have fun three nights a week as opposed to zero nights a week, and end up with a GPA that is one tenth of a point lower than you would have had, I have a hard time believing that you don’t consider that in your best interest. The benefits, as far as I am concerned, far outweigh the costs. I was lucky. I realized that in high school, I did way more work and stressed way more about grades than I had to. I would have ended up here with a slightly lower GPA and SAT score, but I didn’t realize that at the time. Once I was here, I took that knowledge to heart and enjoyed my time as much as I could. I am going to UCLA law school in the fall — somewhere I have always wanted to go, so I don’t think that my excessive entertainment hurt me too much. I have done many things wrong in my time here, but that is one of the things I did right. Another piece of advice originally came from a Guardian editor during my freshman year. I don’t even know his name and have never met him, but I remember reading his final article. He said, and I now repeat, “”A life without risk is a life that isn’t worth living.”” Again, being a management science major and being in classes that repeatedly tell you that risk is a bad thing and that humans are averse to risk, this is hard advice for me to swallow. However, it is very true. If every day of your life is a “”normal”” day, then you are doomed to a life of monotony. Get out and take a chance. Sometimes you will fail and sometimes you will succeed, but in the end it’s the attempt that will make you a better person. I have taken many chances in my time here, and many of them have not turned out the way that I have wanted, but I wouldn’t take back any of them. In fact, I wish that I had taken quite a few more. You will never expand yourself as a person if you never step outside yourself and take a chance. As far as thanking people, it is hard to know where to begin. I suppose the first thanks go to my parents and family. They supported me financially and emotionally throughout my time here. I have had some of the highest highs as well as some of the lowest lows of my life in the past three years, but my mom, dad, and sister, Emily, have been there to help me revel in the good times as well as console me in the bad ones. I am eternally grateful to them for that. I would also like to thank the friends I’ve met here, as well as friends such as Aaron, who I knew well before college but who also played a huge role in my college life. After my freshman year, I had only a few close friends — a situation that I was not used to. Luckily for me, I was randomly paired with my sophomore apartmentmate Brendan. We became good friends and met other friends through each other. The result was a group of people without whom I could not have gotten through these four years. I was talking with my friend Joey the other night about how odd it was that he and I — a Revelle student and a Warren student, a political science major and a management science major — have ended up such good friends. All I can say about him, and many of my other friends whom I met through random chance, is that I simply got lucky and am glad that I did. The last group of people that I would like to thank are my Guardian cohorts. I always knew that I would be thanking you, because from the very beginning I considered you guys some of the most competent and able people I’ve ever met. Whenever work needed to get done, there were always people there to do it and to do it well. This was never more evident than a few weeks ago when our computer crashed at 10 p.m. and essentially erased all of our saved material. We stayed there until nearly 4 a.m. making up for what we’d lost. Without the expertise of the people there that night, it could never have gotten finished. I didn’t, however, know that I would be thanking you guys as friends until halfway through this year. Until that point, I just did my job and left. But when I broke up with my serious girlfriend of more than a year, I realized how close you guys had become. I will always owe you all for helping me through one of the roughest times of my life. It is impossible to single anyone out because you all were so great and understanding. I consider that time a blessing because of all that I learned and the friends I realized I had. As far as memorable events, I have a hard time narrowing them down. This year’s Memorial Day trip to Las Vegas was possibly the best time of my life. I still, and will forever, think back and smile about that weekend and all the fun that my friends and I had drinking, gambling, drinking, and just basically being menaces to society. And drinking, too. I can’t think about my time here at UCSD without thinking about my first true love, Ingrid. Although things didn’t work out the way that we had hoped they would, I will always be grateful to her for all that she taught me about life and love. I am truly a different person for the experience. She taught me that although love sometimes hurts terribly, the good times make it all worth it. Finally, to bring all of the three parts of this article together, I relate something that happened during sophomore year. This was the time immediately before I began dating Ingrid and a time when I had to make a decision between her and one of my close friends. Despite all the derogatory sayings that tell you to choose otherwise, I chose the girl. In spite of the heartache that I felt after the breakup and the pain I felt when I realized I would never see my friend again, I would never and could never make a different choice. The advice part of the story is this: There will be certain times when you have to make a choice because you can’t make it any other way. You have to choose that way because your life would never be the same if you didn’t. During these times, it is important to make the choice you know that you have to make. I would never have forgiven myself if I had chosen the opposite way and was sitting here today wondering if this person that I knew I loved could truly have been the one. The thanks part of this story goes out to family and friends who supported me even though my decision, from the outside, may have looked morally questionable. Even though this was the case, they understood that I really had no choice and that I had to be true to myself. The reflection part is obviously remembering the story and pondering the apology I wish I could give for the pain that I caused my friend two years ago. I truly meant no harm, but in a choice between hurting a friend and eternal questioning of myself, I felt I had no other choice. I hope that when I leave, you can use these words to improve your own time here at UCSD. I also hope that you make the best of your time at this school, because these years will be gone before you know it, and you can’t do anything to get them back. ...

Horoscopes

Aries (March 21-April 19) This week, Aries, a close friend or colleague may provide an unusual glimpse into his emotional motives: Before mid-week, expect others to discuss previously withheld feelings, past social events or sentimental loyalties between friends. All is positive, Aries: Watch for gentle surprises, subtle declarations of love and shared appreciation from co-workers. Listen carefully for promising ventures. Taurus (April 20-May 20) Before Wednesday, Taurus, physical energy may be low: Watch for minor muscle aches, low back pains or temporary skin ailments. Expect vitality and optimism to return before mid-week. Some Taureans, especially those born in late April, may also experience increased dream activity, fresh social insight and quick romantic realizations. Expect deep feelings to emerge, Taurus. It’s time to test key relationships and create long-term romantic commitments. Gemini (May 21-June 21) Romantic frustration and social moodiness will soon fade, Gem: Over the next two days, many Geminis will receive a powerful glimpse into their own emotional needs. After Thursday, yesterday’s family relations and romantic disputes will no longer affect key relationships. It’s time to let go of the past and move on. Cancer (June 22-July 22) Over the next few days, Cancer, watch for a new level of romantic passion in key relationships. Many Cancerians have recently experienced a brief period of romantic distance or complex social pressure. Before mid-week, however, expect a dramatic shift: Both romantic partners and close relatives may now compete for your attention, demand equal time or propose unusual home activities. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Business success and romantic fulfillment now become a top priority, Leo. Over the past few weeks, many Leos may have felt restricted in working environments or misunderstood by loved ones. All of this quickly fades early this week, Leo, and will soon be replaced by dedication and renewed passion. Gather information and social energy over the next few days, Leo, and then prepare for new business projects or ask loved ones for added time, attention or commitment. A strong week, Leo: Stay alert. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Recent romantic delays or social regrets may drain your energy early this week, Virgo: Expect the vague promises of loved ones to now be temporarily bothersome. All of this, ironically, is a precursor to expanding career ideas and new workplace negotiations, Virgo. Start preparing to leave behind fear, low confidence or past employment restrictions. Late Wednesday, vitality rapidly increases: Pace yourself and watch for fast business proposals or sudden announcements from loved ones. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Before mid-week, short-term relationships or brief love affairs may be highly distracting: Expect new friends or potential lovers to present unusual invitations or rare social information. Over the next few weeks, however, loved ones will also vie for your time, social attention and continued dedication. Stay focused: At present, subtle actions and public appearance may be extremely important in close relationships. A complex and demanding week, Libra: Avoid romantic triangles, if at all possible. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 21) Minor health concerns, infections or skin irritations are accented early this week, Scorp. Before Wednesday, expect physical vitality to be quickly changeable. Stress, social tensions or last-minute revisions may now cause delays, Scorp. Avoid taking on extra work or risky projects and all will be well. At present, both workplace and romantic partnerships may need to dramatically change to ensure success. Remain quietly dedicated: By early next week others will take the lead. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Lovers and close friends may strongly disagree this week, Sage: Expect long-term relationships to now conflict with new social obligations. Before next week, loved ones will avoid public gatherings or rapidly discount the ideas of mutual friends. Go slow and expect unusual social outbursts. All passes quickly, Sage, so not to worry. Do, however, avoid bold public statements or changing social opinions, if at all possible. After Friday, daily financial stress will be lifted: Expect important gains. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Late Tuesday, Cap, a lover or close friend may ask for rare emotional guidance. Key issues involve conflicts between relatives, divided social loyalties or doubtful romantic partners. All may seem small, but an alert attention to detail may now reflect an important emotional issue. Offer support and comfort, Cap: Social and family relations will soon regain their balance. After Wednesday, watch also for minor but annoying messages from past business associates. Avoid public financial discussions. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Daily confidence and romantic attraction are highlighted this week, Aquarius. Although workplace differences may now be complicated by ego battles or small criticisms, many Aquarians will approach business decisions with a rekindled self-awareness. Romantic partnerships may be similarly affected, Aquarius: Watch for a powerful wave of sensuality, attraction and emotional motivation to arrive early Wednesday evening. Respond quickly to instinct, Aquarius: Sincere reactions will be rewarded. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Business relationships, social invitations and group plans will clarify early this week, Pisces: Watch for the bold or obnoxious types to no longer create annoying distractions. For the most part, Pisces, this is an indication that long-dreaded workplace or financial changes will be avoided. Some Pisceans may also experience a similar emotional shift in a close relationship. Watch for loved ones to let go of negative ideas, family criticism or outdated opinions, Pisces: Offer genuine support and guidance. If Your Birthday is this Week: Love relationships will dramatically change over the next two months, Gem. Many Geminis will now experience a division between their romantic lives and home priorities. Key decisions may involve repairing a difficult family disagreement or encouraging loved ones to leave outdated influences in the past. Before late August, outstanding relationship questions will need to be settled: Don’t avoid complex decisions. Early September will usher in fast business, academic or financial demands, Gem. Expect to be busy, confident and newly motivated. ...

Incoming Editor in Chief Promises Continued Excellence for the Paper

I know what you’re all wondering: “”How can The UCSD Guardian possibly hope to maintain — let alone improve — its astronomically high standard of excellence with so many editors and staff members graduating?”” Well, not to worry. I promise there will still be good reason to grab a Guardian when September rolls around. It is true, we are losing some extremely talented and hard-working people — people who are irreplaceable, really. Our beloved editor in chief, Vincent Gragnani, will be graduating, leaving behind the newspaper that has practically defined his college career. After two years of being a staff writer for news, and one year of being news editor, Vince was the only choice to hold the reigns of the Guardian this year. And held them he has. The Guardian will never be the same without him. But don’t worry. A couple of weeks ago, Alison Norris and I were elected co-editors in chief (by freakish coincidence, we tied), and Vince has been training us for the job ever since. We cannot replace Vince, but we can bring our own ideas and styles to the Guardian, hopefully building on the quality and standard Vince has brought this year. True, we are also losing our managing editor, Bill Burger. After a year of writing, Bill became sports editor last year, and as managing editor, he kept in touch with his roots by covering men’s and women’s tennis. Bill made a perfect managing editor: He is approachable, decisive and fair, and he can even hold his own with a red pen. Luckily, next year’s managing editor slot will be filled by current news editor, Lauren Coartney. Lauren has done a great job with news this year, and we are confident she will be able to continue in Bill’s footsteps as both an editor and a manager. So we’ve got that base covered. Tom Vu, our opinion editor, will also be leaving us. Like clockwork, Tom managed to come through with a section chock-full of all the skewed and out-there opinions us Guardian weirdoes could possibly come up with. His section was rarely late, and was always solid and balanced. It will be quite difficult to repeat his performance. Facing this challenge next year are Divya Runchal and Jennifer Sposito. Divya became co-opinion editor earlier this year, so she has had plenty of experience. Much like many of our opinion columns, Divya is also skewed and out-there, so our opinion section should continue to be quite interesting. Jenny, who is co-copy editor, is an extremely eloquent writer and should add exceptional clarity and intelligence to the section. Perhaps even Ben Boychuck will agree that our opinion section will indeed be fine. Sports Editor Robert Fulton and Associate Sports Editor Scott Burroughs are also graduating, relinquishing their solemn responsibility of bringing the UCSD community all of the UCSD sports news fit to print. Robert is Mr. Dependable here at the Guardian. His section is almost never late, and in its pages are all anyone would want to know about sports at UCSD. If one of his writers was out of town or sick, Robert would just write the article himself. Scott is the best sports columnist we’ve got. Though sometimes his columns are only slightly related to sports, they are always entertaining, and from knowing the guy, they very well could all be true. And yes, Neil Dennis does in fact exist. Despite losing such talented and diligent sports editors to graduation, sports is perhaps the section we have to worry about least. It will be headed up by current Associate Sports Editor Isaac Pearlman and current Features Editor Josh Crouse. We would be lucky to have just one of these guys running sports. Isaac has worked under Robert for most of the year, so on top of being a superb writer, he knows how to consistently put out a quality section. Josh has written sports for a daily and has been an editor for almost two years now, so he has more than enough experience to run a great section. David Lee, our mysterious Hiatus editor, will no longer be pushing the limits of what arts and entertainment are. Dave expanded the scope of Hiatus to subjects that would not be covered by typical arts and entertainment sections, but he pulled it off beautifully. It is likely that the Guardian will never again have a writer quite like Dave. Knowing this, it is safe to say that the Hiatus section will be a little different next year. At its helm will be Joseph Lee and Charlie Tran. Joe was co-Hiatus editor with Dave for most of the year, so he will bring the experience needed to keep the section running smoothly. Joe is also committed to exposing the ugly underbelly of the oft-criticized San Diego music scene. Charlie, now our design editor, will bring a new look and feel to Hiatus. An avid movie critic and fan of the arts, Charlie should satisfy those who enjoy the finer arts. The Guardian would be nothing without photos, and Photo Editor David Pilz has certainly made it something. Due to the overall quality of Dave’s and his photographers’ work, there have been more pictures in this year’s issues than there have been in a long time. When he wasn’t out shooting or developing, Dave was critiquing and improving his photographers. For that reason, next year’s photo editor, Lyon Liew, is more than qualified to bring the campus informative and aesthetic photos. Lyon has a firm grasp of what photojournalism is, and his sports shots have improved to the point that they are downright outstanding. Last, but not least, Web Editor Brian Wikner is graduating. Brian was responsible for getting every issue onto the Web this year, and he’s made numerous improvements to the Guardian online edition. Coming in in the middle of the night to post the articles and photos online is a thankless job, but Brian did it with enthusiasm and care. Knowing his days at the Guardian were numbered, Brian trained his replacement, Zhi-Ning Liang, to be the next Web editor. A computer science major, Zhi-Ning should continue to improve and add to the Web site, making it more interactive and easier to use. All these Guardian editors who are graduating may just sound like names to you, but you really do know them. You know them by seeing the sections they produce week-in and week-out. You know them by the articles they write. You know them by the photos they shoot. So get to know the new crop of Guardian editors. We’re excited to carry on the proud tradition of supplying UCSD with all the information it needs to be the most informed UC school. ...

Lending a Helping Hand

It is easy to forget that there is a Third World country a few miles south of us, where living conditions are much different and health care is not an option for most people. Just south of Ensenada, however, lies a small medical clinic that UCSD students organize and run free of charge. In March, I went down with a UCSD group called Alpha Epsilon Delta to document the work that they do south of the border. Exam: A student is shown here guiding Yuvaire Elizabeth Marquez through the process of reading an eye chart. AED is a national honors pre-medical society that UCSD became a part of two years ago, and consists of roughly 300 pre-med students. Though they do many things to educate themselves about the medical field (including organizing the first UCSD pre-med group forum), the main endeavor of AED at UCSD is the medical clinic. AED shares the clinic with another pre-med group on campus that is called the Flying Sams, both of which try to go down one Saturday per month. They bring doctors with specializations that include pediatrics, women’s care and general practice. The patients they get depend on the specialization of the doctor. The students walk the patients through step-by-step. They welcome the patients in and provide the preliminary care, which involves asking the patients what their problems are, taking vital signs such as blood pressure and pulse, and staying with patients until the doctor is done with them. The students do as much as they possibly can but never anything they are not trained for. They treat patients until there are no more to treat, which is usually around 10 to 15 patients per day, though there has been an increase since the beginning of the year as more people learn about the program. Vital: AED president Cal Aboulhson takes the pulse of Luis Fernando Marquez. The students take vital signs of the patients and lead them through a rigorous medical examination. Volunteering at the medical clinic is educational for the students because they get hands-on experience that many feel is not available on this side of the border. Being able to walk the patients through each step, working with the doctors and asking them questions exposes students to many important aspects of medical and patient care. The patients who come to the clinic for treatment are much different than patients you see in the United States, according to Ethan Egan, current officer for campus affairs and future president of AED. “”People down there don’t go to a doctor unless they seem to really need it,”” Egan said. When the group went down in November, about 10 of the roughly 15 patients had serious problems. One of those patients was a baby who was extremely malnourished and had severe breathing problems. “”You could just hear this baby trying to gasp for air,”” said Asal Shoushtari, vice president of AED. It turns out that the baby had severe bronchitis as well as a bacterial infection, which prevented her from being able to absorb food into her body. Fortunately, they were able to treat the baby. “”At the end of the day, to see the relief on the mother’s face was really nice because she had gone to so many doctors and finally someone was telling her what was wrong,”” Shoushtari said. Amanda Lamond, who is in charge of running the clinic, once dealt with a woman who had breast cancer and a pain in her spine that they thought might be a sign that the cancer had moved there. They were lucky to have found a place nearby that was able to give her X-rays, which Lamond then took to the doctor. “”I was shaking when I went into the room with the X-rays,”” Lamond said. When she informed the woman that the cancer hadn’t moved, the lady started crying and thanked Lamond profusely. “”I will never forget that,”” she said. Working at the clinic has really touched the students. It has been a learning experience, not only about health care and medicine, but also about the conditions people live in elsewhere in the world. “”I am gaining an understanding of what health care is like in a Third World country … it’s very primitive,”” Lamond said. “”They don’t have the same opportunities that we do here.”” The locals are very welcoming to the group, according to AED. “”The people down there are so warm and genuine and happy that we’re here to help them,”” Egan said. Once, a lady was so grateful that she brought tamales for everyone. “”These people don’t have much money, and for them to do something like that is very powerful,”” Shoushtari said. AED member Nick Athanasiou was happy to do the work. “”We really are making a difference,”” Athanasiou said. “”We are making this possible for them, and that’s really gratifying.”” The group gets along very well with each other and has become like a family. They are able to work well together, even when there is a lot going on. “”It’s an example of how students can work together and achieve something together,”” Shoushtari said. This has been an integral year for the clinic, as it is the first year they have worked in Ensenada. At the beginning of the year, they moved from Tecate to their current location because the facility in Tecate was not large enough to hold a general practitioner clinic. They are still growing, trying to get more medicine, more doctors and be of more service to the people who need care. AED’s main problem is finding doctors to go to Mexico with them. They currently have two doctors who are willing to come down, but they desperately need more. The doctors are ecstatic about working down there and helping the people out — it is an enriching experience for them as well. AED is planning to create a presentation to show at hospitals to get more doctors involved, and hopefully the number of doctors will increase next year. “”We are all looking forward to the day when we can come back [as doctors] and help out,”” Egan said. fe ...

Horoscopes

Aries (March 21-April 19) Over the next few days, Aries, close relatives or friends may present new career plans or financial proposals. After Wednesday, romantic tensions increase: Expect lovers or long-term romantic partners to be delightfully affectionate and seductive. Don’t disappoint, Aries: Loved ones now need your special attention and romantic focus. Taurus (April 20-May 20) Social belonging, private attractions and subtle group dynamics are accented this week, Taurus. Use this time to expand your social circle and foster new intimacy with loved ones, Taurus: You won’t be disappointed. Later this week, a close relative may require unusual business or financial advice. Long-term security or workplace reputation may be key issues: Be helpful. Gemini (May 21-June 21) Career or financial risks are promising this week, Gem: Although relations with authority figures may have been recently strained, expect new assignments and revised duties. Go slow, Gem: Romantic indecision and vague social promises will be a theme for the next four weeks. Cancer (June 22-July 22) Early this week, partnerships and written agreements may require extra examination, Cancer. Don’t let small details slip by unnoticed. After Wednesday, watch also for unexpected social invitations or family gatherings. Someone close may now be frustrated by powerful feelings of isolation. Offer guidance, Cancer: Your acceptance and social optimism may now help others to resolve past disappointments. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Educational projects and past group assignments may require unusual social decisions this week, Leo. Over the next few days, expect previously forgotten duties or postponed deadlines to demand added attention. Late Thursday, a fresh romantic attraction will be compelling: New friendships or short-term affairs are now highly favorable, Leo. Enjoy! Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Long-term relationships and deep emotional commitments may feel mildly strained early this week, Virgo. Don’t be distracted: For the time being, loved ones may be presenting a more negative view of relationships than is necessary. After Friday, letters, messages and unique phone calls may also be accented: Expect rare communications from forgotten friends or distant relatives. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Before Thursday, a romantic flirtation may cause minor tensions in a long-term relationship, Libra: Expect lovers or marital partners to now be highly sensitive to social triangles or newly revealed romantic information. Little of this can be avoided: Pace yourself and wait for others to resolve past doubts and social regrets. After Friday, key money documents may require fast changes. Pay close attention to time commitments or long-term expectations, Libra: Don’t hesitate to take quick action. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 21) Social messages and revised invitations may create unexpected tensions early this week, Scorp: Before Wednesday, watch for friends, relatives or loved ones to require extra support. Respond quickly to the needs and observations of others, Scorp, but reserve judgment: Before mid-June, social promises and planned events will be easily changed. Avoid emotional triangles and mildly unethical flirtations, if at all possible, Scorp: Romantic passions are now highly unpredictable. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Romantic gestures and social invitations may be difficult this week, Sage: Expect loved ones to be unusually critical of new friends. Before Thursday, both friends and lovers may publicly challenge the ideas or social needs of others. Don’t over react, Sage: Private doubts or a complex emotional history between friends may be at issue. Next week, group events or planned activities will bring new relationships into your social circle, Sage: Remain patient and watch for valuable opportunities. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Before mid-week, Cap, romantic celebrations and private social events are intriguing: Watch for loved ones to openly discuss controversial plans, rare ideas or long-term emotional goals. Some Capricorns may now experience the rapid expansion of a new relationship. If so, Cap, expect a fast wave of social introductions and romantic speculation to also arrive. Later this week, recent financial promises may require quick revisions: Minor debts, misplaced documents and forgotten bills are accented. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Social risk and unexpected family discussions may be a theme over the next few days, Aquarius: Watch for friends and relatives to now compete for your attention or issue unusual social ultimatums. Key concerns may involve business schedules versus home obligations or creating extra time for private family events. After Wednesday, romantic attraction also sharply increases, Aquarius: Expect new overtures of admiration and affection from a usually shy or reserved loved one. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Quick reversals are accented over the next few days, Pisces: Before Thursday, expect vague social promises and late cancellations. Long-term friends and colleagues may now be feeling introspective or forgotten by the group. Do your best to improve the social outlook of others this week, Pisces: Friends and workmates may now need extra encouragement to change negative habits. Later this week, a past financial restriction will be lifted: Thoroughly document all new debts and partnerships. If Your Birthday is this Week: Next month’s solar eclipse may dramatically change your romantic and social outlook. After June 21, many Geminis will begin an almost three-year long period of deep emotional change in all close relationships: Key issues may involve freedom versus restriction, outdated expectations and/or letting go of past differences. By late September, long-term relationships that are intended to maintain a permanent role in your life will greatly expand: All else will fade. Before mid-November, single Geminis can expect several passionate new proposals. A vibrant and rewarding few months, Gem: Enjoy! ...

Students Get Entrepreneurial

Two UCSD sophomores have created a unique Web site that helps students selling and buying used books to find each other online. Jeremy Jung and Jordan Brinkman, roommates and co-founders of StudentListings.com, saw a need on campus for a simple and cost-effective way for buyers and sellers of books to find each other. A little over a month ago, Jung and Brinkman were talking about the flyers that they always see posted outside classrooms and in bathroom stalls that advertise students’ books for sale. “”All the tabs at the bottom were always ripped off,”” Brinkman said. “”It’s ridiculous.”” The solution was simple. StudentListings.com is an online medium for students to buy and post books for sale. Contrary to other sites of this kind, such as the online bookstore ecampus.com, there is no risk involved. Posting books for sale is free and sellers can set their own prices. The Web site requires only a five percent surcharge from each sale. Since the exchange can be done in person, there are no shipping costs or taxes. For these two entrepreneurs, creating the site was a challenge, but a fun one. “”It was more work than we originally thought,”” Jung said. “”New challenges kept popping up.”” The entire process took the two computer science majors a month and a half. Designing the Web site took the bulk of their time. Both partners have had extensive experience in computer programming. Jung’s resume includes work at Microsoft as both a software test engineer and a software engineer. Brinkman has worked for the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory on a project called the Human Energy Saver, a tool for planning more energy-efficient homes. “”I had a lot of fun creating the site,”” Jung said. “”It was the business aspect that was quite an experience.”” The process of creating and registering their business was done entirely over the phone and through the mail. “”It took more time to actually figure out which forms to fill out than it did to process them,”” Brinkman said. Indeed, there were many details to cover, such as getting a business license, registering with the Internal Revenue Service and registering StudentListings.com as a legal business name. Jung and Brinkman posted their site on a separate location, http://www.Readyhosting.com, to ensure reliability and accessibility at all times. The service that their company provides is not restricted to UCSD students, but they’re only marketing to this university. In theory, students from different universities could still use the service to post and buy books by simply exchanging them in the mail. There was very little financial risk involved for the two students. “”There is some start-up capital, but compared to a brick-and-mortar business, it’s minimal,”” Jung said. Aside from bank fees, legal fees and processing fees for forms, the major investment was time. “”We’ve definitely put a lot of time into it, but it’s been a great experience so far,”” Brinkman said. They both feel that it will be worth it in the end. “”If it all works out, then we’ll be very happy,”” Jung said. In talking with their friends and fellow students, Jung and Brinkman have received positive feedback on their idea. Registering on http://studentListings.com is simple, requiring basic information such as your name, e-mail address, user name and password. Books for sale are organized by class, department, condition and price, all for the buyer’s convenience. “”As far as we’ve looked, we haven’t found a service with the same or cheaper prices,”” Brinkman said. The two roommates have found working together to be a positive experience. “”It’s nice to have a small company because you can just run to your partner and make a corporate decision right there,”” Jung said. Jung and Brinkman have heard of similar business ventures going on at UCSD, but for the most part, they seem unorganized. For others thinking about creating their own online business, Jung and Brinkman suggest planning to spend a lot of time on the design of the Web site, as this was the area that required the greatest amount of time and effort. “”Come up with an idea, design it, implement it, and you’re done,”” Brinkman said. After testing and perfecting their site’s design, Jung and Brinkman project minimal need for daily upkeep. Also, designing and ordering advertising materials takes time. StudentListings.com plans on using word-of-mouth as its main form of advertising, coupled with T-shirts, pencils and flyers. “”We just want to get the word out because we provide a great service that people should know about,”” Brinkman said. ...