Features

Long-form investigative articles covering people, events and issues that affect the student body. If you have an idea for us to cover, contact us at [email protected]

10 Questions

Why are you in college? Because I didn’t want to get a job yet. What are the best and worst things about what you’re studying? The best things are probably that you get to study really important things that might have an effect on human life, like carrying diseases. The worst things are that sometimes it can be really archaic and useless. What is your favorite place on campus? The Pub. The grad students go there a lot to relax after being here for 12 hours a day. What do you worry about? Eventually getting a job after grad school. Are men and women basically different? Not in any major kind of way. I think a lot of the differences are social. It’s a reflection of the environment you were brought up in and what your perceptions of men and women are. How much attention do you pay to politics? It’s not the most important thing in my life, but I pay attention to it. What political issue interests you most? Right now, I guess, foreign affairs. I just moved here from 5 miles outside Manhattan, so it’s pretty close to home. Has America changed in the past two months? I think people are showing a different side than they used to. They’re a lot more comfortable with expressing patriotism. I’m not surprised by the way things have turned out — maybe a little. Are you interested in the lives of celebrities? Not really. No more than I would be in the lives of other people I don’t know. What is the last dream you remember having? I was on a boat, sailing. ...

Essay-writing Web sites raise questions of legitimacy

Internet sites such as The Evil House of Cheat, School Sucks, Phuck School and ACI offer students several kinds of assistance in writing essays. Some students at UCSD use these services. One student admits to using essay databases for humanities courses. “”I read the books we were assigned and then I read the essays online. I cut and pasted the ideas that looked good and then re-worded them and wrote the rest,”” he said. Erin Kocku and Aaron Herzl, both senior communications majors, believe it is unfortunate that students do not produce their own work but do not believe the university can adequately combat cheating. “”There are just too many people to catch everyone,”” Kocku says. Yet, some students are not bothered by the fact that many of their peers use these sites. Deann Allbee, a junior biology student, comments that, “”In the long run, developing your own ideas gives you an advantage and people who do not lose out.”” The ACI Writing Assistance Center is a high-end essay-writing company run by Danial K. Berman, Ph.D., who has taught extensively at the college level. His company offers services ranging from editing papers to writing custom papers for customers. Custom papers are written by the company’s staff according to specific instructions given by the student. Customers first enter the level of work they are doing: undergraduate, master’s or doctoral. ACI then asks the student if he has a good grasp of the English language, so the paper matches his articulation level. Then it asks for a detailed description of the paper ACI will write, including the kind of citations needed. Most papers take at least two weeks to complete. Daniel supervises the writing of every custom paper, which costs $40 per page with a minimum purchase of $500. ACI’s custom papers are not intended to fulfill academic requirements — they are meant to help students by gathering research materials. School Sucks has an entirely different system. Its motto is “”download your workload.”” In order to enter the site, you have to click on a button that reads, “”I hereby agree that school sucks.”” It has essays on its free database but also links to papercampus.com for a larger selection of papers that are for sale. School Sucks has a section of its site dedicated to addressing the questions of educators, focusing more on secondary education. It advocates that, “”Teacher Unions have become Teacher Mediocrity Societies.”” In the Internet age, the site argues, the focus of education should be on developing analytical skills, not memorization. The Evil House of Cheat, at cheathouse.com, offers free membership to its archive of 1,600-plus essays. But, you have to send them one of your own original essays to become a member. To get access to their entire collection of over 9,500 essays, you have to pay $14.95. Members can view the level the paper was written for, (college or high school), and also the grade the author received for the essay. When asked how the company can rationalize providing students with essays knowing they may be used dishonestly, an employee from Essay Depot replied that using their essays is, “”Like going to any library and looking at a book.”” He and the company urge that these essays should be used as a reference for ideas exclusively. He defended their position by saying, “”We are very up-front. If a professor asks for cooperation, we cooperate. Our essays are not kept a secret. We routinely send copies of first pages to universities.”” Most sites explicitly warn that when students hand in purchased essays to receive academic credit, they are acting illegally and in an academically dishonest manner. The Cheaters Paradise Web site suggests that students who view their essays can just cut and paste if they want. But, their disclaimer points out that all their advice is a joke and should not be taken seriously. Jackie Giordano, the academic coordinator for Eleanor Roosevelt College’s Making of the Modern World writing program, said, “”It’s becoming increasingly easy [to plagiarize] because students no longer go to the library to copy ideas, they can just stay in their rooms.”” Last year, MMW professors began using a new program aimed at stopping plagiarism. They require all students to submit their essays electronically to www.turnitin.com. Turnitin.com is a company located in Oakland, Calif. that uses a “”plagiarism prevention system.”” The system cross-checks essays against each other and those submitted in past years for similar content. Turnitin.com also keeps a database of phrases and ideas that are already published on the Web. If any papers contain plagiarized work either directly or in paraphrased form, the system detects the material and notifies the staff. MMW has already seen results from using Turnitin.com. Spring quarter of last year they found that several students had submitted essays with sections either taken from the Web or from books that had been cited on the Web. The students were punished according to UCSD’s academic policies. ...

The Editor's Soapbox

Right now, Andy Stojkovich is in a coma. Earlier today he was dead. That is quite an improvement by any medical standards. Things tend to change pretty quickly when you aren’t paying attention. After writing that last sentence, my phone rang, and it was my mother. “”Shit,”” I muttered, knowing who was calling and why. There is never good news at this hour. Now it seems Andy, or “”Pop,”” as we all knew him, is in fact dead at the age of 84 due to old age. Is it time to cry and stress over the loss of a loved one, a figure whom I so admired? No. It is sadness I feel, but tears are for later, for his life was, for the most part, a good one, and one that rings all too familiar. For the 21 years I knew him, he always brought a smile to my face. Whether it was some stupid magic trick, or ditching school and sneaking our way into the VIP tent at Pebble Beach by saying I was John Elway’s kid and he was Elway’s dad, Pop always knew how to brighten my day. There always had to be a Stanford connection, usually some big lie like he was Chief Justice Rhenquest’s roommate, or that he had tackled Jackie Robinson on the football field. Of Robinson, Pop would say he was “”the best damn man”” he ever faced in his life, but a minute later he would find some flaw with African-Americans — though always political, never the KKK-style racism we all despise. But, with all his intricacies, making people unexpectedly smile was certainly his specialty. I remember the time when he first saw my family after my brother died, and he didn’t know how to express himself. He calmly asked, “”So what’s new?”” He is no longer with us down here, but most everybody who knew him feels pretty confident that he is in a better place looking down on us. Maybe he is catching up with his wife, who left him over 10 years ago. Maybe he is standing in a long line with firemen, police officers, paramedics, postal workers, flight attendants, pilots, soldiers, frequent flyers and businessmen, who all left their loved ones much more tragically nearly two months ago. It is nice to know there is a little bit of Pop in every one of us at UCSD, and his is the trail that many of us will follow. Like many students at UCSD, Pop was a first-generation American. He was born a long time ago to an immigrant family in San Fransico. His family was from Yugoslavia — or Serbia, as he never let us forget. After attending Balboa High School in San Fransico in the 1930s, he went to Stanford University; not because he was so smart, which he may very well have been, but because of his skills on the gridiron. Pop played defensive end for the Stanford Indians, as they were called back then, well before political correctness swept this country. “”Politically correct”” is one thing he sure as hell was not, but more on that soon. At Stanford, besides playing football, he had various on-campus jobs, just as I and many of my peers have, to make ends meet. He was a campus mailman and was involved in student government. Just as we do, he had to balance fun, work and public service. I cannot help but think that my experiences, a combination of surfing, landscaping, pool maintenance and news writing, are in some way similar to what he did so many years ago on the farm. When he left college and entered the “”real world,”” the world was turned upside down, not unlike it is today. Across the Atlantic Ocean, an evil regime was building on the deaths of those who were different from them and as a result, they threatened to wreak havoc upon the Free World. Eventually, airplanes would shower that hatred upon America on a December morning in a surprise attack on Pearl Harbor. This sounds chillingly familiar. It was not long until Pop joined the Navy and served as an aviator on a bomber. Right now, I am left wondering if I, along with my peers, will respond the same way: by defending our country, which is being attacked by similarly heinous soldiers. That is yet to be seen, but the mood on campus does not seem to be as resolved as I imagine it was in the streets back in his day. Our cause is the same but is our motive and resolve? For his generation was one that responded to the utmost adversity of the Depression and World War II because it had to. Do we feel as if we must act immediately and decisively? We have so much that is similar to our grandparents’ generation, and just as they fought for the survival of liberty and life, now we must do the same. I cannot help but think that we are immune to actual adversity, that we as college students will pass the buck where it would have stopped over 60 years ago. However, for as much as Pop and I seem to be the same, we are so different. As a 21-year-old on a college campus, I am awash in political correctness and liberal thought, and this was, in fact, the main difference between me and Pop. Dinnertime conversation was always entertaining, as my dad would slowly attack Pop’s stubborn Republican ideals. Some families do not encourage conversation about religion or politics. But I pity these families, as they have missed out on nights full of humor and subtle anger that forced our family to accept and love one another for who we are, and not a masquerade of who we want each other to be. It is his feelings toward those not in our family that clearly separate the modes of thought of our two very different generations. Words like “”nigger”” and “”jap,”” which are terms that never even enter my head, could roll off his tongue so smoothly that my cousins and I would look at each other in amazement, realizing that our world is so very different from his. After working in the upper echelons of Del Monte, an American transnational produce company in Mexico City, from the late ’60s to the late ’70s, he would have known some Latinos or at least relate to them, I assumed. But I think the only ones he ever talked to were the ones who mowed his lawn. My best friend, on the other hand, is a Mexican-American, whom Pop and his conservative chums would pass off as merely an “”illegal.”” But the two of them in a room together would always crack jokes or talk football and always in Spanish. It is this dichotomy which perplexes me. Pop and his generation fought the good fight and had some dirty baggage along with it. Will we do the same? As I venture out into the real world, I wonder how my generation will respond to challenges similar to the ones that he and his generation stared down with vengeance, and consequently won. What started as a letter to my ailing grandfather has sadly turned into an obituary, but hopefully his story, as incomplete as I have just told it, will make some of us stop and think. Not only about the challenges ahead of us, but of our loved ones as well. ...

blazing new paths

“”Change will be one of our trademarks.”” Provost Gabriele Wienhausen proudly speaks of the mantra for Sixth College, which will open as UCSD’s newest college in fall 2002. Focusing on culture, art and technology, Sixth College is one that will surely bring about an entirely new view of the university experience. Lyon Liew Guardian “”We will not be categorizing our students by when they graduate, but instead, by when they arrive,”” Wienhausen said. The buildings may not have permanent addresses yet, but the founding principles of the school surpass all normal barriers. The college will emphasize the correlation between civil service, community and expression. Said Wienhausen, “”You are a product of your culture, and culture cannot truly reveal itself without art and technology.”” Lyon Liew Guardian Wienhausen is enthusiastic about the challenge placed before her. “”Twenty years ago, if you had asked me if I would be provost, I would have said ‘no.'”” said Wienhausen. “”That’s serendipity for you. You either make something out of an opportunity that you never expected, or you move on to something else. Later you realize that by saying ‘yes,’ you agreed to something incredibly difficult, but because your heart was in it, you could do it.”” Excitement for Sixth College has preceded its appearance as many students on campus have heard news pertaining to its opening. “”The new college is just going to add to the diversity already on campus,”” said Simone Hilliard, a freshman at Roosevelt. “”It’s great to have new experiences and it will most likely add hands-on experience for the second- and third year students who have gotten tired of day-to-day activities. People may want to transfer into the school because of the fact that it was something that they were interested in, but never found until now.”” The UCSD community’s openness to innovative ideas was one of the reasons that Wienhausen decided to stay after being a professor of undergraduate biology. “”Going into the biology department and seeing how to manage a large group while giving each individual personal attention was a skill that I picked up,”” Wienhausen said. “”It isn’t easy and you cannot do anything without a team. You have to be ready for feedback, and being a good listener is part of that.”” Coming from the Westfalische Wilhelms-Universitat in Munster, Germany, Wienhausen realized the many differences between a university in Europe and a university in the United States: “”The confusion with the language, as people here speak ‘American’ rather than ‘English,’ the lifestyle was different,”” Wienhausen recalls. “”This was one of my most influential experiences as I was coming to a new country and was amazed at the friendly and open people who changed my views of personal interaction.”” Wienhausen went on to become the co-principal investigator of the Howard Hughes Undergraduate Science Enrichment Program and co-director of the doctoral program in mathematics and science education. Enthusiasm from Wienhausen’s words seems to have penetrated many students’ views of the new college and provost. “”Professor Wienhausen’s energy and passion for the sixth college shows you how great the college is going to be. If she is this excited about it, the college is going to be great,”” Hilliard said. Community outreach and forming a connection between the class and the world outside the classroom are both aspects on which the college will focus. Issues ranging from race to personal privacy are matters that are deemed important by Wienhausen. Yet with all the various elements that will be brought together in the Sixth College, there is one common goal that the administration keeps in mind. The goal would be attained once a student is able to grow academically, intellectually and socially. “”A person has many faces,”” Wienhausen said. “”You cannot separate a person into their academic life and their social life. In between, there is a gray area where things overlap. No one thing can determine a person’s success and for this reason, as a whole, we want to make sure that student and academic affairs work closely together.”” Sixth College plans on having direct connections between faculty and students, as well as between students and the communities in which they live. Wienhausen has gone into the community to share her fervor about the new connections that the student body will make once it comes into action. Her eagerness to make her students blossom into well-rounded people stems from her past influences. “”When I first came to UCSD, I met incredible people,”” said Wienhausen. “”People that soon became role models and mentors. I see being provost as my way of helping out and mentoring others, in order for them to reach their potentials and see their possibilities. When you share what you know, that is how you grow as an individual and how we grow as a community. Without mentors, no one would get very far, and we will try and create an environment in which our students will achieve their personal definitions of success.”” Sixth College has its theme placed in expression and thinking outside of the box. But a big secret still remains untold. At UCSD, a college first receives a number and then later is given a name that is normally one of a historical figure. As of now, Wienhausen has some ideas, but the topic is still open to discussion. “”They should name it DaVinci College,”” said Revelle freshman Bryce Warwick. “”It seems to fit since the relationship between culture, art and technology is so interesting. We would create the next wave of DaVincis.”” Sixth College plans on being a campus open to new ideas. Taking students outside of the college setting and making the educational experience more practical is a hope of Weinhausen’s. “”Art can develop a community, and I have seen that an art center can also be a communal center,”” she said. “”Attempting to help students figure out who they are and what they want to do from their hearts are things that I hope will come out of our college.”” The birth of Sixth College seems to be one of positive proportions, but Wienhausen has had to deal with her share of ctiticism. “”Things some may say can be harsh,”” Wienhausen said. “”But you learn to deal with it and be willing to listen to all of it.”” While we still must wait until fall 2002 to see this new center of knowledge and self-realization open, one can still learn more about the opportunities that will soon become available. Wienhausen is attending a luncheon for Women in Science and Engineering on Friday, Nov. 9 from 12 to 1:30 p.m. To sign up to attend the event, check the W.I.S.E. Web site, http://orpheus.ucsd.edu/women/wise,or contact the Women’s Center at (858) 534-0074. Wienhausen’s background, teaching experiences and life values may be impressive, but her charisma as a leader is unprecedented. Sixth College is about to come to our campus, so be prepared. The only thing constant in the world is change, and with this college, change is most certainly right around the corner. ...

10 Questions

Do you still like to dress up for Halloween? Not anymore! What are you doing on Halloween this year? My roommates and I are going to make cookies and just eat the candy we bought. What was your best Halloween experience? One year, I got the chicken pox. My evening was awful because I could not go out, so my sister shared her candy with me. What is your favorite candy? Gummi Savers — anything gummy. What is your favorite day of the week? Friday, because there is no school for two days. If you could travel anywhere right now, where would you go? Toronto, to visit my boyfriend. What are you most looking forward to right now? The U2 concert in November. What is your favorite kind of music? Backstreet Boys, and I don’t care who knows! What is your most annoying habit? I am a neat-freak; I’m obsessive-compulsive. Where do you eat most often at UCSD? I used to have my daily grilled cheese sandwich at Summit. Now, it’s Round Table. ...

The Editor's Soapbox

Every Monday, after our weekly staff meeting, the Guardian editorial board chooses a topic it cares to express an opinion about, settles on a stance by vote and writes an editorial that appears on the Opinion page of the Thursday issue. Are you fascinated yet? Wait, there’s more. Regardless of who votes in favor of the stance and who votes against it, all of the board’s names appear above the editorial. This past issue, we took a stance on California Assembly Bill 25, supporting its passage on the grounds that unmarried couples should have the same rights as married people and that a bill of its nature is long overdue. However, I was the odd man — or rather, woman — out this week. I do not support the bill. This doesn’t really bother me too much, seeing as since I disagreed, I would not have to write the 400 word article. With two midterms and four papers, I didn’t have time to write it anyway. Usually, if a topic relating to social issues or politics is brought before the board, there is a very real possibility that I will disagree with some or all of the rest of my colleagues on one or more aspects of the issue. I hold conservative (very conservative, I’m told) views that I’ve noticed are very unpopular on a college campus — and I’m talking about UCSD here, not Berkeley. On the Guardan, it’s OK that I disagree with the people I sit on the editorial board with. They are also my friends and there are no hard feelings if they end up publicly supporting something I don’t. It is even OK with me if my name also appears on the article. They are mature, intelligent people and there is mutual respect among us. In other arenas, however, I’ve come to feel it is not all right. Yes, I hold conservative views with which many people I’ve met do not agree and yes, I am even (gasp!) pro-life. In fact, it is the aspect of my conservative views that I am most vehement about. I haven’t always been this opinionated: Just last year I quit ed-board because I didn’t have much to say. However, I’ve found that college is a highly politicized environment. Those who don’t espouse political opinions soon find some, and college campuses, even this one, are prime targets for candidates or visibly partisan persons come election time, and even all year long. Due to this and to just getting older, I have a little more to say now. While I’ve seen that in public political events on this campus, both sides (and every point of view in between, for that matter) get represented, it still seems that when it comes to anything even remotely political, everyone is against me, and vocally at that. In some cases, being conservative, or more specifically in my case, being pro-life, is akin to committing a crime of the most serious nature. For example, last year, the esteemed women’s rights advocate and co-founder of Ms. magazine Gloria Steinem visited our campus in support of the Democratic party. She spoke in the Price Center Plaza about why college students should vote Democrat: because the party was friendlier regarding issues about women’s bodies and women’s rights than other parties. She meant, of course, the Republicans, who as we all know want to take away a woman’s right to choose just to make her life unbearable, right? I’m sure that lurking in the shadow of little Gloria at her big podium were people who, like myself, held conservative views and were maybe even pro-life, too. But unlike them, I, being a member of the college press, was invited by Gloria’s handlers to ride on her bus to the next stop on her tour, San Diego State University. I had been having conversations with the event organizers and they knew that I had only come to see Gloria speak because I respected her as a forerunner of the women’s movement and because she was quite accomplished in my field, journalism. My invitation was extended with one stipulation: that I not say anything about being pro-life. “”Fine by me; whatever,”” I thought. But the more I’ve thought about it, and I think about it surprisingly often, it is disconcerting that merely voicing a differing opinion in her presence would have been some sort of capital offense upon which I would be immediately expelled from the bus, which, they had told me is what would happen. Believe me, even though I feel differently about the issue than her, I wasn’t ready to argue with Gloria Steinem about abortion, and it’s not just because she’s famous. I thought Democrats were supposedly better because they are more liberal and thus more respecting of a variety of views. Hmm. I will make one concession, though. I think some of this backlash against pro-lifers is warranted. While it’s not individually their fault, they have been given a bad reputation by those people who stand on the side of busy streets with cardboard signs depicting newly aborted fetuses. I haven’t always been this opinionated, and I’m not going to go into detail about how I feel on every subject and why, but suffice it to say that I have become more politicized in the last couple of years, having been tought in college to see things in an incresingly critical light. If a subject comes up, I’ll tell you where I stand on it because I don’t think that it’s fair that I should have to hide my views just because they are uncommon for my age group or because you disagree with me. I also want you to know that I am not going to shove my views down your throat. If we get into a debate, I’m not going to mindlessly say that abortion is murder or that anyone who thinks otherwise is a murderer. I won’t defend my position by quoting passages from the Bible. If I manage to convince an ed-board some day that I am right on the issue, this is the only way my views will ever be shoved down your throat, I promise. But I do think that if you’re ever famous and I’m invited on your bus and your handlers ask me politely to please not mention a differing view than yours, I think I’ll decline the ride. ...

Costumes at the last minute can be easy

It’s that time of year again. People around the nation are dropping insane amounts of money on extravagant costumes to impress the masses. And then there’s you: a broke college student with absolutely no money to spend on a costume. With that in mind, here are a few quick, easy and, best of all, cheap suggestions for costumes that are sure to get a glance or two. The first costume is “”Duct Tape Man.”” The construction of this costume requires five to six rolls of duct tape and one paper plate. First, dress in pants and a long-sleeve shirt — you’ll see why in a second. Next, cover yourself in duct tape. That’s right, just wrap it around your body until you are covered in duct tape from the neck down. Make yourself a cape by attaching several long strands of duct tape together and putting it on your back. To finish the costume off, use the duct tape to attach the paper plate to your chest. Then fashion a nice “”DTM”” on the plate to let everyone know that you are, in fact, “”Duct Tape Man.”” The next costume is an oldie but goodie: the shower. For this costume you will need a shower curtain with rings, some rounded PVC pipe, straight PVC pipe and some duct tape. Simply fashion a ring out of PVC pipe and attach the shower rings and curtain. Take two pieces of straight pipe and attach them to the round pipe, angling down. They will attach to two pieces of rounded pipe that will be on your shoulders. Then duct tape them into place and you have your very own shower — perfect for dancing close with that special someone. The next costume requires a lot of guts to wear. You can call it futuristic garb. This costume requires clear plastic wrap, colored plastic wrap and a colored thong that matches the color of your plastic wrap. Women can add a skimpy bra that matches the color of plastic wrap, but this is strictly optional. To construct this costume, simply put on your undergarments and wrap around the naughty areas of your body several times with the colored plastic wrap. Wrap the rest of your body in the clear wrap. You should bring the clear plastic wrap to the party and invite others to join you in your ultra-futuristic attire. Finally, there is the laundry basket. For this costume, you will need one rectangular laundry basket (fairly large), some string and a lot of laundry (preferably underwear). For this costume, cut out the bottom of the laundry basket and put your legs through. Attach the string to the basket and use it as suspenders to hold the basket up around your legs. Then drape laundry over yourself. Depending on how brave you are — and how expertly you drape the laundry over yourself — you do not need to wear underwear with this costume. These are just a few suggestions to keep this holiday enjoyable, yet affordable at the same time. It’s a pretty safe bet that these costumes will be unique this Halloween and will get a lot of attention. ...

'Dracula' will seduce theatergoers

Tired of the same old Halloween entertainment starring Jamie Lee Curtis, Neve Campbell or — worse yet — Jennifer Love Hewitt? If so, La Jolla Playhouse’s production of “”Dracula: The Musical”” is an alternative for a good thrill. Courtesy of La Jolla Playhouse Ghosts, monsters and vampires have lurked in Halloween lore through the ages. Whether it has been in films or books, the undead have always been fascinating. “”Dracula: The Musical,”” based on Bram Stoker’s 1897 novel “”Dracula,”” chronicles the mysterious life of Transylvania’s most infamous resident. When attorney Jonathan Harker visits Dracula’s home about a property transaction, Dracula is revitalized. When he sees a picture of Harker’s fiancee, Mina Murray, Dracula feels that Mina could be the woman that he lost many centuries earlier. The plot thickens as Dracula travels to Victorian-era London to seek his long-lost bride. While there, Dracula encounters vampire-hunter and professor Abraham Van Helsing as well as Mina’s best friend, Lucy Westenra. Trouble ensues as Dracula seduces Lucy and turns her into a vampire, prompting Van Helsing and others to hunt down Dracula and kill him. “”Dracula: The Musical”” is a production full of romance and lust, in addition to the supernatural, mystery and suspense of any good horror flick. Adapting “”Dracula”” from a literary work to the stage is a challenge, but the crew of the musical is full of veterans of the theater business. The music was written by Frank Wildhorn (“”The Scarlet Pimpernel,”” “”Jekyll and Hyde””) and the lyrics were created by Don Black (“”Sunset Boulevard””) and Christopher Hampton (“”Sunset Boulevard,”” “”Les Liaisons Dangereuses””). Under the direction of Des McAnuff (“”The Who’s ‘Tommy,'”” “”How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying””), “”Dracula: The Musical”” is a technically complex production. Stagehands are practically nonexistent because virtually all the sets are brought onto the stage by machines and hydraulics. Surprises abound as props appear out of thin air and special effects are usedheavily. The design of the set alone is worth the price of admission. “”Dracula: The Musical”” is a Broadway-level production that is not often seen on many campuses. The musical score has a haunted, detached feel to it, embodying the feelings of Dracula. McAnuff is very excited with the score. “”The music is quite different than Frank Wildhorn’s other scores”” he said. “”It has more of a classical feel, less pop and more mesmeric and haunted and unworldly I find his melodies for ‘Dracula’ truly arresting and, needless to say, I hope the rest of the world agrees.”” “”Dracula: The Musical”” is definitely more refined and thrilling than your standard B-movie. If you are looking for a truly haunting alternative for getting your Halloween spooks this week, “”Dracula: The Musical”” might be just what you are looking for. “”Dracula: The Musical”” is the last production of the La Jolla Playhouse’s 2001 season and continues from now until Nov. 25 at the Mandell Weiss Theatre. Tickets can be purchased online at http://www.lajollaplayhouse.com and student discounts are available. ...

Haunted San Diego offers thrills and chills

If you ever hear strange noises when you’re alone or have ever felt a cold breeze when nearby windows and doors are shut, you might not be alone. Courtesy of Hotel Del Coronado Step inside the history of San Diego and you will soon discover that our city is host to its own paranormal activity. Psychics and parapsychologists have flocked to numerous sites in downtown San Diego, documenting enough spooky appearances and disturbances to scare even the most level-headed person. Visitors to such sites claim to hear strange sounds, while others experience bizarre sensations that they attribute to alleged supernatural activity. Whether or not you believe in ghosts or the paranormal, check out some of the following attractions this Halloween. They might just send chills down your spine. The Whaley House Located in Old Town, the Whaley House is by far San Diego’s spookiest attraction. Built in the 19th century, this Victorian-style house was once San Diego County’s seat of government, and it has a creepy history. In the second half of the 19th century, a man named “”Yankee”” Jim Robinson was accused, under conflicting reports, of stealing a large boat. Although he attempted to elude the police, he was quickly caught by a civilian who took the liberty of whacking him over the head before officials threw him in jail. Robinson received a trial, but was probably only semi-conscious during the proceedings due to his head injury. The court found him guilty in no time and ordered him hanged. However, due to a calculation error, Robinson did not die immediately. His feet touched the ground and he suffered a long, painful death. It is believed that Robinson’s spirit still lurks in the house. Visitors report hearing sounds of heavy footsteps upstairs and recall feeling strangled while passing through the archway where Robinson was killed. Also, the house’s original owners, Thomas and Anna Whaley, their daughter and one of her childhood friends are said to remain on the property — in spirit, at least. The smell of Thomas’ cigars and Anna’s lavender perfume linger in the rooms, and the children’s laughter can be heard. Even Regis Philbin, who spent the night at the house in 1964, left in a bit of a nervous panic after seeing an apparition at 2:30 a.m. The Whaley House is located at 2482 San Diego Ave. It is a museum in the Old Town San Diego State Historic State Park and is open every day except Tuesday from 10 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. Admission is $4. For more information call (619) 297-7511. La Casa de Bandini Also located in Old Town is La Casa de Bandini, a beautiful adobe hacienda built in 1829 for Juan Bandini and his family. In 1850, it was converted into a hotel and it is now a Mexican restaurant. Unfortunately, dinner out may be more than you bargained for. Some claim that a female ghost in a long dress who glides along the balcony and through sealed doors is a permanent resident. Reports also allege that lights will turn on and off by themselves. Others hear footsteps on the wooden floor upstairs. Casa de Bandini’s address is 2660 Calhoun St. and the phone number is (619) 297-8211. The restaurant opens at 11 a.m. Monday through Saturday and 10 a.m. Sundays. Hotel Del Coronado This gorgeous hotel is not exempt from its own mysterious events and paranormal activity. Kate Morgan, a visitor at the hotel around the turn of the century, died here. The circumstances surrounding her death were never completely put to rest, leaving others to speculate about murder or suicide. There are two rooms that are believed to be haunted: 3312 and 3502. One supposedly contains Morgan’s soul, and the other contains the soul of a hotel maid who also died under mysterious circumstances. The Del is hard to miss if you’re in Coronado. Its address is 1500 Orange Ave. and it can be reached at (800) Hotel-Del. La Casa de Estudillo This adobe house in Old Town was built in 1829 for Captain Jose Maria de Estudillo. In 1910, the house was restored to feature a functioning kitchen and furnished rooms. Although La Casa de Estudillo is beautiful, it is also spooky and its history is tainted with unexplained incidents. Visitors report feeling sudden cold spots in certain rooms and hearing faint sounds of prayer. There are also reports that a young Victorian girl wills a rocking chair to sway back and forth in a bedroom. La Casa de Estudillo is located on Mason Street in Old Town and is open from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. daily and is free of charge. Whether you’re a believer or you think these reports of the paranormal are all bunk, head out this week and check it all out for yourself. It just might make your Halloween that much spookier. ...

DUAL MOVEMENT

Rebecca Anshell is a Marshall sophomore. Anna MacMurdo Guardian She is an active member of UCSD’s chapter of the International Socialist Organization and of the UCSD Peace Coalition. She is eloquent and graceful. The T-shirts she wears bear political messages, such as one listing reasons for abolishing the death penalty. Her blue eyes are intense when she speaks. She is uncompromising when it comes to her commitment against U.S. military action in Afghanistan, and in the importance of making the voice of peace advocates heard. These efforts, she believes, have been successful. Scott Thomas Guardian “”People are really ready to get active,”” she said, citing rising numbers at ISO meetings and the large number of students who came to the “”United for Peace, Not for War”” rally Oct. 4. She was also pleased with the lack of response from the war hawks. “”There has been right-wing retaliation to the anti-war movement,”” she said. “”But so far it has been ridiculously small.”” Anshell characterized those responsible for such counterprotests as “”frat boys.”” She and the other students speaking and acting for peace feel that their movement has power and is gaining momentum. Warren sophomore Renee Elliot senses the change in the air on campus. “”I think [activism] has been a really positive factor in my UCSD experience,”” Elliot reflected. “”It’s kind of changing my opinion of UCSD, [about] them being kind of apathetic.”” She said she was “”pretty cynical”” before, but her outlook is improving. “”People are coming out of the woodwork,”” she said. “”I’m optimistic.”” The ISO brought its message to Balboa Park on Oct. 13 for a citywide peace demonstration organized by the San Diego Coalition for Peace and Justice. And more than just attending, one of their members, UCSD teaching credential student John Patel MCed the event. Patel is a graduate of UC Berkeley, and so his political intensity is unsurprising. He has been a vocal opponent of sanctions on Iraq and the bombing of Serbia. His experience from those efforts is apparent in the savvy he displays when speaking about his politics. He opened the rally by reading the SDCPJ’s point of unity. “”We condemn the attack on Sept. 11 and mourn the victims,”” he read, with an interpretor following in Spanish. “”We call for an end to terrorism not through war but through international cooperation, justice and law. We oppose anti-Islamic, anti-Arab, anti-immigrant and all racial, ethnic and religious bigotry and violence. Fear of terrorism has led to attacks on our civil liberties; we call for their vigorous defense, for citizens and non citizens alike.”” The people at the rally, who spanned all ages and carried signs with slogans such as “”Wage Peace,”” “”Ignorance Is the Most Violent Element in Society,”” “”Y Trust W?”” and “”Israel Is Founded on Palestinians’ Death and Disorder,”” applauded and cheered. “”Wow,”” one attendee observed. “”Nice turnout.”” Roosevelt sophomore Renee Maas agreed that the number of people there was impressive, but she says she is is looking for more response from college students. “”There’s not very much discussion,”” she said about the war while stretching out on the grass. “”That’s really disappointed me.”” “”TAs and professors haven’t talked about it much,”” she noted. “”I understand there’s a set syllabus, but it’s not every day that our country’s involved in a war. It’s kind of disappointing — it’s really disappointing.”” Muir junior Andrew DeCaminada explained why he felt student involvement and awareness are important. “”I think if there is a lot of [involvement], it could make a big difference,”” he said, “”but if it’s just little groups all over the place, we won’t make much difference.”” Maas pointed out, “”Being at a university, there are a lot of students who will end up in a position of power … what happens today is going to affect everything in the future.”” Maas, like the members of the ISO, is firmly opposed to the war in Afghanistan. DeCaminada, however, attended the rally to learn more and hoped other students would adopt a similarly open-minded attitude. “”Whether they agree with the war or not, it’s just a matter of forming an opinion and taking a stance”” he said. When the speakers finished, the rally became a march, and attendees formed a long block, moving down the Prado into the park. Some chanted “”One, two, three, four — break the silence, stop the violence,”” or, “”Not my president, not my war — we’re fired up and won’t take it anymore.”” Some of the loudest voices were those of the students. Vince Vasquez is a Revelle senior. He is president of the Conservative Union, an active member of the College Republicans and a contributor to the California Review. He describes himself as “”tall, dark and handsome.”” He wears headrags and wire-rimmed glasses. His soft voice and relaxed demeanor belie the obvious passion with which he speaks and acts. One of the things Vasquez is passionate about is the United States. He loves his country. He is quick to point this out. “”The idea that there are limits to patriotism, limits to how much you can love your country — to freedom-loving Americans, it’s absurd,”” he said. There are people, he believes, who do not love this country as they should, as he does. For him, those people are the ones involved with the peace movement. He said their “”anti-war rallies”” have actually been “”anti-American.”” “”A minority of people … honestly hate their country,”” he said. Those who counter “”what we have decided upon”” are anti-American, Vasquez said. “”If we see ourselves as Americans and America is attacked, we’re going to support President Bush and the military 110 percent”” he said. “”We support them. We’re not going to question them.”” Vasquez speaks often of the need for unity, which he feels is being disrupted by the anti-war activists. “”We need unity to have peace,”” he said. That desire to promote unity was part of what motivated Vasquez and College Republicans president Lucas Simmons to organize the Oct. 23 “”Pro-America Rally.”” Vasquez also said he felt it was important to make sure students “”hear our side”” — that is, the side of the organizations with which he is involved. “”It’s very disheartening to see that there was maybe one voice coming from UCSD,”” he said, meaning the voice of the anti-war movement and the media coverage of its rallies. Indeed, at the rally, Vasquez explained to the crowd, “”Our hope today is that the UCSD community will grasp a greater acknowledgment of our perspective.”” Warren senior Brian Brook was a featured speaker at the rally. He is a co-founder and co-chair of the United Campus Coalition. This organization tries to foster understanding among students of differering ethnic, religious and ideological backgrounds. He is passionate about the need for student involvement and student activism. We must realize, he said, that “”apathy can no longer carry us forward.”” “”We see people around here not caring about what’s going on,”” Brook told the Price Center crowd. “”How many people have to die before we do something about people dying and suffering in the world?”” He advocated an aggressive role for the Unites States in encouraging and supporting democracy throughout the world, and stressed that Americans must involve themselves personally. “”As lovers of freedom, we must fight for freedom not only for ourselves, but also each other,”” he said. “”We have to believe that democracy is the only way to peace.”” Brook and many of the other speakers at the rally may have viewed war as a means toward peace, but that viewpoint was not shared by all in attendance. Early in the rally, banners were hung next to the American flag, on the Price Center marquee. From the balcony above, Anshell and Patel lowered the red paper, revealing the slogans “”War Makes It Worse”” and “”Give Peace a Voice.”” Down on the ground, other ISO members held up signs. Reactions to the protest were mixed. Simmons was gracious. “”That’s what makes our country: they have a right to have that opinion and express it, whereas in other countries, they wouldn’t have that right,”” he said. “”That’s what democracy is all about.”” Roosevelt junior George Davids criticized the dissenters. “”It’s good that we have a pro-American rally and not an anti-American rally,”” he said. “”There have been too many of those lately.”” He added of the protestors, “”I think it’s really funny that a lot of these guys say, ‘No more racist scapegoating’ on their signs, and we’re, preaching the same message here.”” Marshall senior Clint Greene cheered the speakers and listened intently. He was pleased with that turnout and with those at other recent activist rallies on campus. “”It’s good to see students, regardless of their points of view, getting involved in some way,”” he said. These rallies are only the beginning of UCSD’s dual response to the growing conflict in Afghanistan. Many campus organizations plan to hold events such as teach-ins and panels in the next few months. Though they may differ ideologically, both sides of this swell in student activism suggest that more is to come — and more may soon be involved. For more information on the UCSD ISO, e-mail [email protected] The UCSD Peace Coalition can be reached at [email protected] ...