Arts & Entertainment

The Hiatus Calendar

Thursday The performers of Lower Left will use mud, water and their sense of brutal sincerity for their performance and dance act at Sushi Performance & Visual Art in San Diego. There will be strong language and nudity. The show will run through Dec. 3 and again from Dec. 8 to Dec. 10. Call (619) 235-8468 for more information. Check out “”Gynomite: Fearless Feminist Porn!”” at Dizzy’s in downtown San Diego. Eight intelligent and sexy women will tell their stories about sex. The event starts at 8 p.m. and there is a $5 cover charge. Call (858) 270-7467 for more information. Check out some of the best in indie rock at the Che Cafe on the UCSD campus just east of the Theatre District. Songs: Ohio will headline and will be supported by Damien Jurado, Paris TX and Kind of Like Spitting. The show begins at 8 p.m. and tickets are $6. Call (858) 534-2311 for more information. Friday Digital Underground will perform at the Belly Up Tavern. The show starts at 9 p.m. and tickets are $15. Call the Belly Up at (858) 481-8140 for more information. Saturday Ska-Punk? Punk-Ska? Take your pick when the Aquabats perform at Canes Bar & Grill. The show kicks off at 7 p.m. and tickets cost $12. Call Canes form ore information at (858) 488-9690. The incredible voice of Dave Wakeling which once led the English Beat and General Public can be heard at the Belly Up Tavern. The show starts a 9 p.m. Call (619) 220-TIXS for more information. ...

Beatlemania Returns to Theaters

We all know being a rock star is tough. Even before VH-1 dared to go “”Behind the Music,”” director Richard Lester took a light-hearted approach to the rockumentary when he made a movie about four young lads from Liverpool trying to survive the fast-paced road to stardom. Part comedy, part adventure, and part musical, “”A Hard Day’s Night”” captures John, Paul, George and Ringo in the midst of Beatlemania. It was 1964 when movie houses packed with screaming teenage fans first showed this classic Beatle film. The Fab Four had just invaded America and the question troubling every young girl was: Which one is cuter, John or Paul? The soundtrack, which features “”Can’t Buy Me Love,”” “”I’m Happy Just to Dance With You,”” and of course “”A Hard Day’s Night,”” was often drowned out by the uncontrollable wailing of devoted fans. Thirty-six years later, Miramax Films will re-release a fully restored version of “”A Hard Day’s Night,”” just in time for Christmas. The re-release of “”A Hard Day’s Night”” was originally planned for September of 1999 but was pushed back because of the August 1999 re-release of another Beatle movie, “”Yellow Submarine.”” It was then slated to hit theaters in October 2000, but Miramax pushed the release date back once again to coincide with release of other Beatle merchandise, such as the new “”Beatles 1″” compilation album and the Beatles Anthology book. “”A Hard Day’s Night”” will finally hit theaters Dec. 1 in New York and Los Angeles, and then Dec. 8 nationwide. As the sons and daughters of baby boomers, many of us have heard stories about the first time our parents saw “”A Hard Day’s Night.”” It is hard to believe that those doe-eyed, pre-teen Beatlemaniacs who have been preserved for posterity on old footage of the Ed Sullivan Show actually grew up to invest in mutual funds and retirement pensions. But if you have ever wondered what became of those screaming Beatle fans, they probably became your parents. So what better way to spend quality time with them this holiday season then by showing them you’re hip to their kind of music? OK, perhaps that is a bad idea, considering taking your mom to see “”A Hard Day’s Night”” might unleash some very unwelcome nostalgia trips. However, the chance to see this award-winning piece of pop culture in the theaters should not be passed up. This glimpse into history shows rock ‘n’ roll when it was still innocent, and gives insight into that all-important question: Who is your favorite Beatle? ...

Review: Albums

Guru’s Jazzmatazz “”Streetsoul”” MCA Records C- Quite a few years back, Anheuser-Busch mounted a huge ad campaign in an attempt to promote responsible drinking. The centerpiece of its campaign was a brilliant slogan that ultimately became embedded in America’s collective national consciousness. It went something like this: “”Know when to say when.”” Now, I must admit I do not know whether this product of marketing genius was effective for its intended purpose. In any case, I believe that this phrase should be taken to heart by all, and it should not be exclusively applied to responsible alcohol consumption. It should also be directed toward the continuous, inexcusable production of potentially great — but ultimately mediocre — hip-hop recordings. Guru’s latest Jazzmatazz endeavor is an excellent example of this sad trend. Let’s be brutally honest for a minute. Everyone knows that Guru has never been a very good MC, but for some reason many people seem hesitant to admit it. Why is that? What do people think they owe him? It is well past time for this shameful facade to end. MCing is a continuously evolving art form, and few can argue that Guru merely has not kept up with the times. For the most part, Guru’s lyrics these days are inane and uninspired, and his flow is often nonexistent. His trademark deadpan voice used to be novel, but now it’s just annoying. He is exceedingly arrogant regarding his so-called “”skills”” on the mic, although in most cases it is painfully obvious that if he didn’t have Premiere backing him up, he never would have blown up in the first place. This is not to discredit him entirely, of course. As a part of Gang Starr, Guru has made a significant contibution to hip-hop as a whole, but that’s because Gang Starr was a formulaic success that focused and relied mainly on Premiere’s beats and production. Mr. “”Gifted Unlimited Rhymes Universal”” may have been somewhat lyrically impressive on “”Words I Manifest,”” but he hasn’t progressed much since then. All of this might sound too harsh, but it’s readily apparent. Just consider your favorite Gang Starr tracks from past albums. Odds are, they’re the cuts with the special guests who shined while Guru did his best to avoid ruining the whole damn thing. Now, to Guru’s credit, it should be noted that his first Jazzmatazz album was certainly innovative, groundbreaking and relatively well-done. It spawned a number of commercially successful singles, while stretching rap, R&B and jazz in whole new directions. The problem is that Guru hasn’t been able to follow it up, because he’s been too busy promoting himself on the two subsequent Jazzmatazz albums, this one included. On “”Jazzmatazz Vol. 1,”” his vocals seemed to blend almost seamlessly with the guest artist contributions, and more often than not, his vocals were appropriate to the song’s subject. This is not the case any more. Lately, Guru’s incessant demand for respect seems to be sabotaging his art, with every other verse or skit on Streetsoul talking about how great he is, whether it’s a would-be revolutionary anthem like “”Lift Your Fist”” (featuring the Roots) or a supposed seductive love ballad like “”Night Vision”” (with Isaac Hayes). Simply put, his self-aggrandizing rhymes ruin almost every collaboration on this album — especially the ones that would have been definite hits if he just toned it down a little. Maybe that’s why I’ve been so hard on Guru here; it’s just too disappointing to hear so many collaborations with respected artists like the Roots, Isaac Hayes and Herbie Hancock go down the toilet thanks to Guru’s insipid vocals. The potential was there, and there are a few bright spots on this album, but for the most part, this album is a huge letdown. Friends shouldn’t let friends pick this one up. — Sky Frostenson PJ Harvey “”Stories From The City, Stories From The Sea”” Island Records A PJ Harvey recently moved to New York and then she wrote an album about it. “”Stories from the City, Stories From the Sea,”” Harvey’s latest release on Island Records is littered with references to the Manhattan skyline. Against the backdrop of “”The Empire State Building,”” Harvey traces a love affair that blooms “”on a rooftop in Brooklyn,”” and then wilts on the album’s mournful last track. “”Stories”” is one of those albums you have to listen to from start to finish. It is like a novel and it tells a story. The album begins with Harvey longing for “”a different land”” in “”Big Exit.”” Harvey and her mysterious companion discover New York with wide-eyed wonderment and fearless enthusiasm, like two tourists who just got a hotel room overlooking Central Park. But their love does not last forever. After the glitter of New York fades, Harvey and her lover go their separate ways as the album concludes with “”Horses in My Dreams”” and finally “”We Float.”” Musically, “”Stories”” is more accessible than past PJ Harvey albums. In the past, Harvey’s sense of melody could have been hard to take in. However, “”Stories”” offers a mix of experimental melodies as well as tunes that will have you singing along in your car. The optimistic “”Good Fortune”” sounds oddly reminiscent of Liz Phair’s “”Exile in Guyville,”” while “”This Mess We’re In,”” on which Radiohead’s Thom Yorke adds vocals, is classic Harvey. Harvey has created an amazing album that has the depth of great literature and the drama of a good movie. “”Stories from the City, Stories from the Sea”” is enough to make you want to hop on a plane and go find New York for yourself. — Lindsay Boyd ...

The Hiatus Calendar

Thursday Jazz act Return to One will perform at Galoka on La Jolla Boulevard. You can expect to hear original tunes as well as some John Coltrane, Wayne Shorter and more. The show begins at 9 p.m. and the cover is $5. Call (858) 551-8610 for more information. Etta James is in the Rock ‘n’ Roll Hall of Fame, and in 1994 she won a jazz Grammy and the W.C. Handy award. However, mere awards do not convey the amount of energy she exudes. James will perform at the Belly Up Tavern. Tickets are $35 and the show starts at 9 p.m. Call Ticketmaster at (619) 220-8497. Friday San Francisco blues guitarist Tommy Castro will perform at 4th & B. The show starts at 8 p.m. To buy tickets call Ticketmaster at (619) 220-8497. UCSD alumnus and San Diego native Chris Klich will announce the release of his CD “”The First Take”” with a show at Dizzy’s. The album features Klich on the clarinet, alto and tenor sax as well as the flute. The show starts at 8:30 p.m. and tickets cost $4. Call (858) 270-7467 for more information. Regina Carter has redefined the image of what a violin can do. Carter will bring her blend of jazz, funk, African and Brazilian music to the UCSD Mandeville Auditorium. She has performed with Wynton Marsalis, Lauryn Hill, Billy Joel and Dolly Parton. Tickets cost $20 and the show begins at 7:30 p.m. To buy tickets call the UCSD Box Office at (858) 534-TIXS. Saturday Indie rockers Karate will perform at the Che Cafe at 8 p.m. Tickets cost $6. For more information call (858) 534-2311. There was one song on the radio all the time by Common Sense. Little did you know that their mix of reggae, rock, funk and soul adds up to more than just one radio hit. They will perform in the Belly Up Tavern at 9:15 p.m. Tickets cost $10 and can be purchased through Ticketmaster by calling (619) 220-8497. Sunday Alternative rock band Flaming Lips will perform at 4th & B. Tickets cost $16.50 and the show starts at 8:30 p.m. For ticket information call Ticketmaster at (619) 220-8497. You cannot miss a show by a band that calls itself Midget Handjob. They will perform at the Casbah. Tickets cost $8 and the show starts at 8:30 p.m. Call Ticketmaster at (619) 220-8497 to buy tickets. Pop punk rockers No Use for a Name will perform at the Mira Mesa Epicentre. The show begins and 7 p.m. Call for ticket information at (858) 271-4000. Monday If you know country music or even pop music, for that matter, you know the magic of the Dixie Chicks, who will perform at the Cox Arena. Tickets will be sold through Ticketmaster outlets or you can call Ticketmaster at (619) 220-8497. Wednesday Start your Thanksgiving with a bit of jazz. Dizzy’s will host a Thanksgiving Eve Jazz Fest featuring Peter Sprague, Chris Thiele, Sean and Sarah Watkins, and Kevin Hennessy. Show times are at 8:30 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. Tickets cost $8. For more information call (858) 270-7467. The Offspring are often criticized for being mainstream, but you’ve got to admit that they have catchy tunes. They will perform at the Cox Arena at 8 p.m. SX-10, Cypress Hill and MxPx will open the show. For ticket information call (619) 220-TIXS. ...

Get More Than Just Blockbusters for Your Buck

In the constant search for the unique and wonderful, look no further than Blockbuster Video’s “”Pre-Viewed”” movie section. With a little time and a little money, you can invest in your own movie collection, with a surprising selection of low-cost gems. In this section, you’ll find hundreds of titles from every movie genre. The idea is pretty simple: The store gets multiple copies of a video when it is a new release, the title moves over to another shelf when it is no longer a new release, and they sell the rest off, which means a good buy for you. The first thing to keep in mind with any bargain hunt is that you must be willing to invest some time in looking. You are liable to find the prospect somewhat daunting, so here’s a breakdown of the pricing. All movies for sale are priced according to how recently they were released and their general popularity. So the older and lesser-known films are the best deals here. To find movies good for when you are extremely bored or stoned, you can browse the $2.99 section. Be forewarned that most of these are movies that no one has ever heard of. But considering their current sale, which offers $2 off any previously viewed movie, this option is tantalizing. We’ll start at the low end. For $3.33, I found “”Corporate Fantasy,”” a 1999 ultra-soft-core porn, the kind that only a family video store would carry. It was so lame that not even the Fox network would show it. If not for its shits-and-giggles value, this movie would never leave the store. Moving up to $5 movies, there is a dynamic improvement in the quality of movies available. From a 1995 MTV series comes “”AEon Flux,”” a futuristic cartoon sci-fi with a lot of sexual overtones. AEon Flux is an agent for the fictional, communist country of Bregna and she has a love/hate/kill relationship with Trevor Goodchild, an opposing nation’s leader. Goodchild is incredibly evil and that turns Flux on and pisses her off, so her goal is to kill him or sleep with him. Most know this show for the mega-gore factor and the surreal twists that completely lose you. It’s definitely a cult classic in the making. Other notable titles include “”Drop Dead Gorgeous,”” “”The Corndog Man,”” “”Titanic”” (shudder), and “”Welcome To Woop Woop.”” The last title is directed by Stephan Elliot, the same guy who made “”The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert.”” “”Welcome to Woop Woop”” is a bizarre contribution to the arts from Down Under. It’s the twisted tale of a New York con artist on the lam in Australia, where he wakes up to find that the hitchhiker he picked up is now his teen-age wife and that her beer-guzzling psycho father is the ruler of a town that no one is allowed to leave. It’s something like “”The Addams Family””-meets-Australia on acid. A must for the quirky — it’s odd, but funny, and your friends will think you are some kind of freak for owning movies like this. Also recommended is Martin Scorsese’s latest and strangest, “”Bringing Out The Dead.”” It tracks two days in the life of burnt-out paramedic Frank Pierce and his descent into madness and subsequent redemption. It is a very dark and gritty movie and it doesn’t always manage to make sense. The plot has a couple of ambulance-sized holes, but Pierce’s bizarre partners and his attempts at getting fired keep things interesting. Basically, Pierce can’t get past the memories of people he could not save. This film is in the middle of the price range, listing at $7. Finally, we have the full-priced videos at $14. These are the must-haves, the classics that will not be going down in price, or the movies that you just want now. Two oustanding selections in this group are “”Dune,”” a sci-fi epic, and “”Drowing Mona.”” The latter is a hysterical comedy about dismemberment, semi-accidental death, and covering your ass. Bette Midler gets killed off and everyone in town is a suspect, including her husband and son. Packed with famous faces, you may want to wait for this movie to drop in price. ...

big mouth strikes again

The Word of Mouth Tour was definitely more “”word of mouth”” this year than last year. If you’re not familiar with it, it is a hip-hop tour with an underground aesthetic — one for people who love the music and the art of hip-hop. CHAKO SUZUKI/ Guardian Performing live were MC Supernatural, the Beat Junkies, Dilated Peoples, Cut Chemist, DJ Nu-Mark and Jurassic 5, who were headlining. It was amazing to see how large the turnout was for the two scheduled shows on Nov. 8 and Nov. 9 at the Belly Up Tavern. Compared to last summer’s Word Of Mouth Tour at 4th & B, the house was packed. It seems that Jurassic 5 and Dilated Peoples have rounded up a more diverse fan base since appearing on popular music video channels. The Beat Junkies kicked off the show with feats of turntablism, followed by Cut Chemist and DJ Nu-Mark, who did a set before introducing Supernatural, who has an impressive talent for freestyling and getting audience participation. His skills for coming up with lyrics on the fly were extraordinary, especially since he asked for words from the audience for his rap “”Three Words”” and ended up with words like “”philharmonic,”” which are not easy to freestyle with. CHAKO SUZUKI/ Guardian In another song, he took items from the audience’s hands and added them into the rhyme — random objects such as condoms, Tic Tacs and Advil. His other impressive feat was his right-on impersonations of famous MCs. Every time he turned his back to the audience, he would impersonate Biggie, Xhibit, Wu-Tang or Busta Rhymes. Last year, Supernatural blessed the stage in the Price Center with completely different impersonations. In part of the song, Supernatural enacted a duet between himself and Biggie and astounded the audience with how well he could impersonate him. Supernatural’s performance and energy were amazing. He came back in the end for a rap intro of all the performers in the tour. The up-and-coming hip-hop duo from Los Angeles, Dilated Peoples, took the stage next. The group consists of Iriscience, Evidence and DJ Babu from the Beat Junkies. Their sound is a bit aggressive and their beats are driving and lucid. During the summer they released their debut album, titled “”The Platform,”” and released the single “”Triple Optics”” on the “”Funky Precedent”” compilation, which included groups such as Jurassic 5. They amped the crowd with the performance of “”Triple Optics”” and their single “”Work the Angles.”” Dilated Peoples were able to maintain their underground sensibilities — therefore, much of the crowd was not familiar with their talent. However, the duo kept the audience’s heads bobbing with its dynamism, constant movement and overwhelming confidence, which showed through in their lyrics. At the end of their set, Evidence broke a beer bottle over his head as a dare and actually ended up momentarily knocking himself out. When Jurassic 5 made their appearance, it was obvious whom the majority of the crowd had come to see. Half their set was from their self-titled EP and the other half was from their recently released album “”Quality Control.”” The single “”Quality Control”” made the crowd go wild. Surprisingly, their earlier singles, such as “”Jayou”” and “”Concrete Schoolyard”” left most of the crowd a little quiet. Jurassic 5 delivered the full flavor of their innovative and authentic sound that celebrates music, not money, which is refreshing after all the recent deliverances in hip-hop music. As usual, Jurassic 5 put on a charismatic performance with their organic sounds, harmonized choruses and their incorporation of different elements of hip-hop. In one part of the show, break dancers came out, and the show highlighted the talent of DJs Nu-Mark and Cut Chemist, whose extensive collection of rare grooves, instructional and hip-hop music drives Jurassic 5’s cutting-edge sound. DJ Nu-Mark amazed the crowd by playing the drum set, drum machine and the koto, a Japanese stringed instrument. As expected, Jurassic 5’s fresh sound, their lyrical talent and supreme beat makers made for an experience that will not be forgotten. The most disappointing part of the show was not the performance but the audience. The crowd came to 4th & B last year because it fully appreciated the artists, the music and the underground. This year’s fans did not come because they were hyped through popular media like MTV or BET. Dance circles formed, and the audience knew the lyrics and the members’ names when the microphone was pointed at it. At one point, Cut Chemist was telling the audience what songs he had just spun with Nu-Mark: “”The third song is from ‘Brand Nubian,’ which might be a little underground for some of you.”” This insult to the audience probably caused some pleasure for real fans. To get the crowd hyped up, members of Jurassic 5 did a little stage diving, which turned out dismal in the end. Some audience members ran up on stage to dive, and then one drunken and very large fan dove off the stage and landed on his neck. This ended the show a little sooner than it was supposed to end, with ambulances and rubber necking. Although the end was a big disappointment, there was no way the performers could disappoint. The Word of Mouth Tour gave insight to old fans and newbies into the way hip-hop is supposed to be and was a good vehicle for delivering the extraordinary talent and innovation of the performers. If you are looking for related events, check out these upcoming shows at the Belly Up: All events are 21 and over. DFH: Every Monday night. Disco, funk and hip-hop spun live for only $8 starting at 9 p.m. Etta James: Nov. 16 at 7:30 p.m. and Nov. 17 at 8 p.m. This legendary blues and R&B singer is making two comeback appearances for $35. Common Sense: Nov. 18 at 9:15 p.m. for $10. San Diego’s own ska, reggae and rock band. Poncho Sanchez: Playing Nov. 22 at 8:30 p.m. for $10. This is the world-famous Latin jazz bongo player. Do not miss! Goldfish: Nov. 25 at 9:15 p.m. for $7. San Diego’s premier funk band and party. Common: Nov. 29 at 9 p.m. for $20. Chicago native hip-hop MC, known for his extraordinary rhyming and story-telling skills. If you’re a fan of hip-hop, a must-see! Wailing Souls: Nov. 30 at 9 p.m. for $12. Well known reggae duo from Jamaica. Digital Underground: Dec. 1 at 9:15 p.m. for $15. Old-school hip-hop group that is bound to make you move. ...

The Hiatus Calendar

Thursday The Dandy Warhols will play at Canes Bar & Grill at 8 p.m. to promote their new album “”Thirteen Tales from Urban Bohemia.”” Enjoy their layered guitar and keyboard-heavy sound for $10. Call Ticketmaster for tickets at (619) 220-8497. Do not miss Jurassic 5 and their unique style of positive lyrics and phat beats at the Belly Up Tavern. Call Ticketmaster at (619) 220-8497 to buy tickets. The show starts at 9 p.m. The Wallflowers will christen the new Jenny Craig Pavilion at the University of San Diego. The Wallflowers, led by Jakob Dylan, will promote their first album in nearly four years. Tickets cost $35 and can be purchased by calling (619) 260-7575. Friday Do you wonder where Hootie and the Blowfish have gone? Tonight they will perform at the Viejas Casino & Turf Club. The show starts at 8 p.m. and the tickets cost $35. Call Ticketmaster for tickets at (619) 220-8497. Saturday The eclectic No Knife will play at the Che Cafe, which is located on the UCSD campus just east of the theatre district. No Knife will be supported by Sunday’s Best. No Knife is a local band and they will perform at 8 p.m. Tickets cost $6. Call (858) 534-2311 for ticket information. Spain’s Noche Flemenca will showcase their passion and sensuality at the UCSD Mandeville Auditorium at 7:30 p.m. Tickets cost $25 and can be purchased through Ticketmaster by calling (619) 220-8497. The Homeless Advocates of San Diego are the sponsers of the Homeless Artists and Writers Association Benefit. The Homeless Advocates hope to encourage a connection between all members of the community. Tickets are $25 and will be sold at the Sushi Theatre on the night of the performance. The performance starts at 7 p.m. Call (619) 233-8500 ext. 1500 for more ticket information. Sunday Ravi Shankar and Anoushka Shankar will perform at Copley Symphony Hall at 7 p.m. Ravi Shankar was popularized by his friendship with then-Beatle, George Harrison. His daughter Anoushka Shankar, who also plays the sitar, continues the legacy of her father with the recent release of her second album. Anoushka is the youngest and only female to be presented with the House of Commons Shield by the British Parliament for her artistry and musicianship. Tickets start at $8 and can be purchased through Ticketmaster at (619) 220-8497. Tuesday The Squirrel Nut Zippers along with the Dirty Dozen Brass Band will bring their style of big band/swing music to 4th & B. Tickets cost $20. Purchase your tickets through Ticketmaster by calling (619) 220-8497. Wednesday Jewel will try to fight against the commercial shortcomings of her 1998 release, “”Spirit”” and her overexposure on VH-1, MTV and nearly every single pop-rock radio station. Jewel will perform at the California Center for the Arts at 8 p.m. Tickets start at $30 and can be purchased by calling (619) 232-HELL. Thursday Jazz act Return to One will perform at Galoka on La Jolla Boulevard. You can expect to hear original tunes as well as some John Coltrane, Wayne Shorter and more. The show begins at 9 p.m. and the cover charge is $5. Call (858) 551-8610 for more information. ...

Old Sound of New Order

NEW ORDER Courtesy of Fuel 2000 Records BBC Radio – Live in ConcertFuel 2000 Records A- New Order can be described as one of the most definitive bands of the ’80s and one of the earliest founders of ecstasy-driven techno. They have produced some of the greatest club hits of all time and they are continuing to be remixed by Perfecto, Shep Pettibone and Armand Van Helden. The original mix of “”Bizarre Love Triangle”” can still rock any party with good musical taste. However, in the live album they recently re-released for the American public, you can hear just how vulnerable and uncomfortable New Order were with their success at Glastonbury in 1987. Bernard Sumner, the frontman of New Order, was still recovering from the suicide of his close friend and bandleader Ian Curtis. Curtis had led Joy Division to mythical proportions and from its ashes came New Order. Sumner was not sure how to handle his colleague’s death, but in the memory of Curtis, New Order pushed on. In this timeless recording of their show in Glastonbury you can hear the energy and nervousness of the New Order performance. Being on stage took away their cool and clean studio sound and revealed the abrasive guitar of Bernard Sumner over the melody of Gillian Gilbert’s keyboards and Peter Hook’s definitive bass riffs. Their sound is reminiscent of a punk-rock group pushed along by the technology of the time. Their raw Glastonbury performance almost recaptures their punk influences of bands like The Clash and sheds any image of a sappy pop-techno group. Sumner tears through the songs on his guitar with such ferocity you almost forget about the clean studio tracks that we have gotten used to. Raw intensity and powerful vocals lead the group past missed chord changes, flubbed lyrics and the general insecurity of a group coping with something it has always been uncomfortable with: success. “”Touched by the Hand of God”” opens the album and sets the tone as Sumner wails and yelps throughout the song. “”Temptation”” is played at an amphetamine pace as Sumner cries out, “”up, down, turn around. Please don’t let me hit the ground.”” This performance reveals a band that is on the verge of success. As they introduce their “”new”” song “”True Faith,”” you can hear an early version of what was to become a massive international hit. You can also feel the vulnerability of Sumner as he stumbles through the verse before he comes back with a rousing chorus. You can only imagine the frenzied dancing of the crowd as the first few bass notes are plucked out on “”Bizarre Love Triangle.”” Sumner growls through the words of the song as the now classic synths build upon each other to climax at a glorious finish. Amidst the cheers of the crowd you can hear a self-conscious Sumner tell the crowd, “”notice that all our songs finish with big endings. Big songs, small dicks.”” The nostalgia of “”Perfect Kiss”” beautifully melts into grinding guitars and an angry and distorted solo. “”Age of Consent”” follows with more thick guitars doused with chorus effects and the passionate vocals of Sumner, who yells, “”I’m not the kind that needs to tell you just what the fuck you want me to.”” A guitar-heavy cover of Lou Reed’s “”Sister Ray”” at the end of the show seems to cry out that New Order still remembers Ian Curtis and their previous band, Joy Division. New Order’s performance on this album is not polished nor is it cleaned up in the studio. This will not be best performance that you will hear from New Order. There are other New Order albums you should probably get before this one. But this performance on a summer evening at Glastonbury in 1987 is what defines the attitude and energy of the enigmatic New Order. ...

Review: Charlie's Angels

They ended the series for a reason. Girls can only flip their hair and smile like dolls for so long before audiences get bored and look for other forms of entertainment. CHARLIE’S ANGELS “”Charlie’s Angels”” is overflowing with plenty of fighting action and heavy makeup. There is a sufficient amount of eye candy for both sexes to withstand the film, but I wouldn’t recommend to this one more than once. Let me explain. The directors and producers tried their very best to imitate and ridicule the popular 1970s series. Consequently, the three Angels, Cameron Diaz, Lucy Lu and Drew Barrymore, did a fine job of running around in tight, revealing clothing, looking tough yet perfectly cute and primped, and beating up some attractive bad guys without smearing their lipstick. All while they attempted to maintain the happy, yet typical, lives of independent Los Angeles women. In spite of the predictable ending and the lack of any relevant dialogue, I was entertained for the majority of the film. However, by the end I didn’t have any trouble departing from the movie theater. For some reason, the movie had a lighter atmosphere than the series. Some funny cameos were included; Bill Murray and Tom Green presented their quirky one-liners and L.L. Cool J dropped in for a minute or two. It was fun to watch and even more fun to make fun of, but that’s about it — no real message given, no moral to be learned. Just a quick tip before you buy your ticket: Walk in with the notion that the movie will be horrible and it will actually turn out to be better than you expected. And don’t forget to say hi to Charlie for me. ...

Music Department Students Go With Their Flow

Dueling saxophones, vocal wanderings, talking trumpets, drum solos and even turntables — hell, just about any sound may be included in this quarters Jazz Improvisation performance. On Monday the students of George Lewis’ music 131 class will present a night of improvisation running from swinging versions of traditional standards to loose interpretations of experimental scores. Yet despite the title of the class, this performance will include a lot more than what people typically consider to be “”jazz.”” “”I’m not really interested in jazz,”” Lewis explained. “”Well, I love it … but I have a problem with the word.”” A music isn’t alive to grow if it is too defined. “”I prefer the garage band model; there is no one looking over your shoulder, pointing their finger.”” Many students don’t realize that the UCSD music department is one of the most innovative in the country. Beyond the typical classical repertoire, our music department pays attention to the last century of musical development and expands on the outdated canon of significant composers. The department houses amazing composers and performers who are active today — faculty, graduate and undergraduate. However, improvised music is still gaining respect. “”There could be a lot more interest in jazz and other types of improvised music,”” Lewis said. “”The department is moving towards giving improvised music more credit.”” Jazz, of course, is one of the most amazing musical forms to have come out of the last century. New ideas of collective jamming, vocal quality, distortions, percussion significance were developed throughout the history of jazz — from the earliest days of Dixieland, swing, Ellington, bebop and free jazz. All of these forms are present in the “”type”” of jazz that’s going around today. A great example of what is going on today will be heard at Monday’s concert. Some of the best musicians here at UCSD will play time-honored jazz standards, classics from the bebop era, experimental collaborations and compositions of their own. I’ve seen pieces that involve people running across the stage and pieces that involve the creative scratching of records on two turntables. Lewis is a great facilitator for this class because he knows how to use what’s new while respecting the past; how to keep the art of improvised music alive and kicking. “”I like an atmosphere where students feel nurtured — I’m tired of directing,”” Lewis said. “”I want the students to direct the music themselves. That’s the danger of the pedagogy — it’s so authoritarian. “”I have a multigenre background in music; contemporary notated music, computer music, jazz, etc.,”” Lewis added. “”But my students’ backgrounds are different than mine. I don’t want to give them my experience, I want them to use what they have — I’m learning from them.”” Hopefully, Lewis himself will play. He is a well-known trombonist, improviser, composer and multimedia artist and has worked with some of the best in all his areas of interest. He has been directing this class since 1991, touching on all types of techniques, concepts and styles. He has watched the class change over the years, accepting more and more forms of improvisational explorations and student input. “”You know, I wish for more musicians,”” Lewis said. “”There are 18,000 students on this campus. I don’t want total beginners — but if students know how to play their instruments they can always learn to improvise.”” If you are a big fan of improvisational music you should check out this concert and if you know absolutely nothing about improvisational music you should check out this concert. Hey, if you’re interested in playing music you should consider joining this class. This is a chance to see great performance that is also cheap and close to home. The concert is in Mandeville Recital Hall, costs $3 for students and starts at 8 p.m. Come hear for yourself what some of your schoolmates study. ...