Music

SD Board Club Foam Slide

[caption id="attachment_11893" align="alignleft" width="201" caption="Jessica Hsu/Guardian"][/caption] No, that waterslide you saw this past Friday wasn’t a flashback of 2009 Sun God Festival debauchery. (Let’s face it — 2009’s Sun God wasn’t epic enough to warrant flashbacks anyway.) This time, there was foam. After being denied a place at the proverbial inn of the Student Center block party last Wednesday, a joint SD Board Club and Koala effort aimed its sights on Library Walk for Friday. But, after a classic Paul Terzino cockblock, the affair was relocated: Bikini- and board-short-clad folks were forced to trek over to Sun God Lawn, where the blue tarp was rolled out and the leaf blower turned on full blast. ...

New Artwork Represents Campus Latino Presence

Dear Editor, I respectfully dissent with Don Lindsay’s letter published in the Oct. 15 issue, entitled “New Campus Mural Is Politically Charged,” regarding the new campus mural. First, the mural says “Health Care for All,” not “Government Health Care for All.” It never says whether health care must come from the government or from private corporations. Second, there is already a place that displays “openly Christian symbols” and “faith-based American patriots” advocating stronger border security. It is called Texas. Furthermore, Lindsay’s comments regarding Che Guevara are completely irrelevant, because Che is not on the mural. Third, diversity is neither “anti-white” nor “anti-straight.” As a heterosexual white woman, I feel threatened by neither the new mural nor the gay rights movement. An anti-white mural would say “F— All White People” on it. The mural by Peterson Hall is not anti-white, but pro-Latino. The two are not necessarily the same. I will still be heterosexual if and when gay marriage is legalized in California; same-sex marriage poses absolutely no threat to my heterosexual identity nor to that of any other heterosexual. Lindsay protests the mural’s displaying of “clearly religious … statements,” then contradicts himself by saying the mural reflects “anti-faith” sentiments. He ought to make up his mind whether the mural is inappropriately religious or inappropriately secular. Finally, Lindsay’s description of the “anti-American Hispanics … undermining our great, traditional American culture” is inaccurate. Most, if not all, of UCSD’s Latino students to whom this mural is directed live in this country legally. They work hard, pay taxes and believe in liberty and democracy as firmly as any other group of Americans. Additionally, immigration is one of our great American traditions. This country has seen waves of immigrants from India, Japan, China, Cuba, Russia, Germany, Italy, Ireland and many other countries. All of these groups have contributed positively to the nation, bringing new foods, languages and ideas to the United States. Welcoming these immigrants to our shores is an American tradition that has stood the test of time. Perhaps, as Lindsay is such a fervent patriot, he will one day travel to New York City and read the inscription underneath the Statue of Liberty: “Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free.” — Amanda Woods Sophomore, Muir College ...

Squash All Frogs on the Road to Prince Charming

With SlutFest 2009 (read: Halloween) nearly behind us, a string of warm ‘n’ fuzzy holidays await. It’s during this magical time of year that I normally scour the Web for evidence of humanity’s altruism. But, sadly, with every holiday miracle comes a crime report featuring an everyday psychopath to steal old St. Nick’s thunder. Leading off the season, we have a newly dumped Portland misfit who broke into his ex-girlfriend’s house to beg for another chance. After her immediate rejection, he pushed her against a wall, whipped out a knife and stuck it to her tiny pet fish. In case you didn’t learn your lesson from “Fatal Attraction” (the ’80s thriller in which Glenn Close boils her ex-lover’s pet rabbit in a jealous rage) don’t let this happen to you. It’s tougher than it sounds. The world teems with those obsessive Facebook stalkers who just happen to glance at a Friday night dance party you’re attending and — by sheer coincidence — rain on your bump-and-grind parade. But hold your judgment a quick second — we’ve all been that jealous dumpee at some time. One day you’re in your boyfriend’s delicious BMW, surveying all the poor single people trudging to the shuttle stop, and the next day you’re alone with “Tyra” and a silent phone, asking Ben & Jerry what you could have possibly done to deserve this. It bites to be left in the dust, but after a few weeks as the stereotypical, See’s box-throwing dark princess, you too can bounce back. When the tables turn, however, and you become the dumper (aka heartless bitch), it’s easy to shrug off that miserable abyss you’ve pushed your ex-lover into and jump back into the brawny embrace of college singlehood. For me, Christmas came early last year after my breakup: two apartments full of frat-guy testosterone moving into our hallway. Deck the halls, baby! But if your ex’s pathetic cries are still drowning out the silver bells, it’s time to pull the plug on those weekly sympathy heart-to-hearts. Acknowledge that you’re the reason for his bucketful of tears — if you seem oblivious to your ex’s pain, he will do everything possible to drown you in it. But also recognize that you don’t have to hold his hand while he’s dabbing his tears — that’s in his mom’s job description, not yours. While the bloody goldfish made it stupidly obvious that our aforementioned Web felon’s deranged behavior screamed “restraining order,” it might not be so crystal clear when your average ex has crossed the threshold of obsession. After all, this is a person you presumably felt some scrap of a feeling for at one point. It may be difficult to recognize when he’s truly jumped off the deep end. But take the time to look a little harder, folks, and really try to discern those warning signs. Because discarding that old, worn-out battery before it becomes a toxic pool of acid can save you a whole lot of cleanup time. Note that the fish-mauler from our Web story released a post-crime statement saying, “If she can’t have me, she can’t have the fish.” By the same logic, a psycho ex can — and will — try to sabotage your chance of reeling in another lover. The classic example: personal jabs made in public. Last year’s ex pulled aside my best friend and told her he can’t even believe he liked me because Hispanic girls aren’t his type. I mean, premature balding isn’t really my cup of tea either, but you don’t see me whispering that into his best friend’s ear. Kindergarten-level racial slurs and other playground jabs reveal that your ex is lacking something key in the post-break-up rehab process: Pride. If he’s not even bothering to preserve his good-guy image, he’ll do anything to hijack your attention. It’s a surefire indicator of his quest to tarnish your image so that you appear unlovable to anyone who’ll listen — because after all, if he can’t have you, no one should. So when he starts pulling the race card and you — still trying to be sympathetic — haven’t done the snip-snip yet, remember that when kids act their naughtiest, it means they want love and attention. Which isn’t your problem. These blips on your lifeline, you must remember, are big boys. So go ahead and get it all out in one — I repeat, one — conversation. Anything more will only satiate his ever-burning desire to keep you in his life. Commence silent treatment. This is especially hard for people who have Snow White’s desire to befriend all fellow humans and cuddly animals (example: me). But fish-killer has a valuable lesson to teach us all: The frogs you kiss before arriving at Prince Charming’s castle will amount to an eternal buzzkill if you let them stick around and make you feel guilty. However many sweet-talking apologies escape your lips, they’ll only fall on seething, deaf ears. The next time a breakup goes awry and you have to pull a disappearing act, remember: It’s for your own good. No one wants to get chewed out for talking to the hot neighbor or not responding on Facebook chat. To a scorned lover, everything you say will always be wrong, nothing you do will ever be right and no one you date will ever live up to his glorious precedent. So when you see that drunk dial coming in, do yourself (and your Kleenex-chaffed ex) a favor and let it go to voicemail — life is too short to let the frogs overstay their welcome. ...

College Fees: A Steeper Climb

[caption id="attachment_11886" align="alignleft" width="300" caption="Illustrations by Yuiko Sugino/Guardian"][/caption] ON CAMPUS — Last Friday, Muir College students voted to fork over another $12 per year to keep their college’s organizations and events afloat. However, after A.S. Council nearly doubled its funding last year with a pricey referendum, it seems college councils might be better off asking their rich Price Center uncle to fill spending gaps before scapegoating students. The referendum, to be instituted Spring Quarter 2010, will increase Muir College’s activity fee from $7 to $11 per quarter to offset the Muir College Council’s depleted reserves. With only $8,000 in unallocated funds as opposed to last year’s $18,500, the council needed more money for unforeseen future costs and those last-minute pizza study breaks — and they got it. Once upon a time — as recently as the 2005-06 academic year — individual college councils sought out funding from A.S. Council, which is rolling in it this year with $861,500 in Concerts and Events funding at its disposal. Thing is, the old system required student orgs to jump through seven separate funding-request hoops to get their hands on fees, begging each college for a little cash before grovelingon the fourth floor of Price Center for even more. The overhaul, which sent those orgs directly to the A.S. floor, was intended to make the funding process simpler for everyone, college councils included — as they’d no longer have to decide how many Benjamins the knitting club deserves. Currently, the colleges don’t receive a dime from the A.S. Council. Instead, every cent they spend comes from a separate, smaller activity fee on our student bills. It may be a more streamlined approach, but it’s also problematic. When college councils go broke (which happens a lot), there’s only one place for them to turn: their students. As anyone who’s ever witnessed a student-cashier battle at Cafe Ventanas knows (doughnuts, it turns out, are actually $1.25), we students aren’t very willing to shell out. During Winter Quarter 2009, both Muir College and Sixth College tried to pass marginal fee referendums just like this one. Muir’s failed. This time around, the measure just barely passed — with a mere 52-percent support rate. Four bucks a quarter may not amount to much more than one sacrificed Perks cappuccino, but — on principle — the six college councils should be able to petition A.S. Council to help fill their funding gaps before begging their apathetic student bodies. After its own lucrative referendum last year, the A.S. Council is the sole institution on campus with more money to spend than it knows what to do with. It would be far more cost effective to use the funding we already have than to tax students even more. A.S. President Utsav Gupta said funding college councils would take away from the money now set aside for all-campus orgs. He insisted all $630,000 of their allocation has already been set aside for one group or another this year. But even if it’s not possible for A.S. Council to lend Muir College Council a generous hand this year, it could be feasible in the future. It’s not impossible to rewrite A.S. legislation — councilmembers did it four years ago, and can do it again. Their self-proclaimed mission, after all, is to “promote student engagement in all areas of campus life” — and they should spread that involvement to all areas of campus. Gupta has expressed interest in doing just that. He wants college councils to host their own events the day of the Sun God Festival to expand the event to other parts of campus. But money for that has to come from somewhere, and A.S. has far more in reserves than do college councils. If the A.S. Council wants to see that type of participation, they’ll need to make sure it’s funded. Before this can happen, though, the A.S. Council must communicate more with the college councils. As it stands, the councils themselves operate almost autonomously from the Associated Students. The only semblance of discussion between the two comes from a pair of senators from each college serving on both the A.S. Council and their respective college councils. A couple go-between figureheads can’t lead a real, cooperative effort to serve the student body — in order for that to happen, and for the possibility of greater collaboration and cash-swapping down the line, college councils should at least hold quarterly meetings with Gupta. He may not be the sugar daddy they need him to be now, but forging a stronger council-to-council connection will, in the end, push individual colleges’ interests to the forefront. Additional reporting by Trevor Cox. Readers can contact Cody Christie at [email protected] ...