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Two Conference Road Wins Evens Water Polo’s Record at 11-11

The No. 11 Tritons suffered a disappointing second-half loss against No. 7 UC Irvine on Oct. 23, narrowly missing a three-game sweep and forcing UCSD to settle for a 2-1 weekend. The Anteaters scored four goals in the third quarter to erase the Tritons’ commanding halftime lead, handing the team a tough 7-6 loss. UCSD recovered the next day and executed a quick turnaround in its Oct. 24 doubleheader, posting conference victories over Claremont-Mudd-Scripps and Pomona-Pitzer in Claremont to even the Tritons’ record at 11-11. UCSD’s road trip continues this weekend when the team faces off against Loyola Marymount University and Cal State Long Beach. Both teams have dealt the Tritons defeats this season. The Tritons finished off last weekend on a high note, defeating Pomona-Pitzer 10-6. Junior driver Bryce Madsen, junior driver Ryan Allred and senior driver Sean Roberts each scored two goals apiece, while sophomore goalkeeper David Morton blocked 12 Pomona-Pitzer shot attempts. Allred has been on an offensive roll since scoring his first six goals of the season against Chapman University on Oct. 9. The transfer now has 20 scores on the season. “Ryan is a great player with one of the quickest shots I’ve ever seen,” Roberts said. “We knew that, coming from a [junior college], Ryan was going to have to step up and play intense on defense and offense. Overall, he’s a very sound player and his quickness is probably his best attribute.” Coming off their loss to UC Irvine, the Tritons faced CMS for the first time this year. The last time these two teams met, UCSD demolished CMS 24-8 in the 2008 Western Water Polo Association Tournament. This time around, UCSD wasn’t able to run up the score as high, but still came away with an 11-8 win. The Tritons jumped ahead to a 4-1 lead after the first period and extended their lead to 7-2 at halftime. UCSD stayed strong in the third period, scoring three times for a 10-4 advantage going into the fourth quarter. Senior two-meter defender Steven Donohoe led UCSD with three goals, while Madsen and senior two-meter defender Peter Gresham netted two scores. Four other Tritons got on the board with one goal each. “We wanted to bring the same intensity that we brought against Irvine and we knew Claremont wouldn’t be able to handle counterattack and our press,” Roberts said. “In the end, it paid off.” Friday night, the Tritons faced off against a streaking Anteater squad — UC Irvine came into the contest having won six straight, including an Oct. 11 victory against UCSD. The Tritons came out strong, holding the Anteaters to one goal in the first half and scoring three in the second period to lead 4-1 at halftime. UC Irvine entered the second half with renewed strength, jumping on UCSD for two scores in the first three minutes and cutting the Tritons’ lead to one goal. Madsen got the Tritons back on track, converting on a six-on-five opportunity with just under five minutes left in the third quarter. The Anteaters took advantage of Triton defensive miscues, closing out the period with two man-up goals to even the score heading into the final period. “During the first half we had really strong intensity on defense and on the counterattack,” Roberts said. “We came out with same intensity in the second half but we weren’t as consistent.” Junior driver Sean Cruz regained the lead with a six-on-five conversion two minutes in. UC Irvine’s Tom Kruip tied it up with a goal one minute later, and the Anteaters scored again with 2:28 left in regulation to claim their first scoring advantage of the game. The Tritons were unable to fight back, falling to the Anteaters by one goal for the second time this season. “Overall, we showed good effort in the game,” Roberts said. “We knew going into it that this was going to be a physical game and we brought physicality to it. They just made one more goal than we did.” UCSD now prepares for a face off at Cal State Long Beach on Oct. 30 at 7 p.m. and an away match against WWPA rival Loyola Marymount University on Oct. 31 at noon. The Tritons look to reverse a recent string of losses to the No. 1 Lions, which include three defeats to the team earlier this season. “We want to show them that we belong in the top 10,” Roberts said. “We know we have to have no mental mistakes against these teams.” Readers can contact Janani Sridharan at [email protected] ...

Pair of 1-0 Wins Lands UCSD in First Place

WOMEN’S SOCCER — Bouncing back after losing an important conference game last week, the No. 11 UCSD women’s soccer team returned to its winning ways over the weekend. The Tritons sneaked past California Collegiate Athletic Association rival Cal State San Bernardino 1-0 on Oct. 23 at Triton Field. UCSD followed up with another 1-0 victory two days later against Cal Poly Pomona on Oct. 25. The victories improve the Tritons record to an impressive 14-3 (11-3 CCAA) giving them possession of first place in the CCAA South Division. UCSD got out to an early 1-0 advantage against Cal State San Bernardino and never looked back. The Tritons took command of the match in the seventh minute, when junior midfielder Lisa Bradley deflected a corner kick and headed it past the Cal State San Bernardino keeper. Bradley’s first goal of the year makes her the 13th player on the squad to score a goal this season. Unlike the Coyote offense — which shot very aggressively to overcome UCSD’s one goal advantage — the Triton offense was selective with their shots. San Bernardino outshot UCSD 12-3 in the game. “Yes they had a lot of shots,” head coach Brian McManus said, “But I don’t think [sophomore goal keeper] Kristin [Armstrong] was ever bothered, there was never a hard save to make.” UCSD’s defense played very efficiently and did an excellent job of disrupting the aggressive Cal State San Bernardino offense. Of the 12 Coyote shots, only three required a save. Armstrong maintained the Triton lead by making two saves — one in the first period and one in the second period. Bradley — who scored the game winning goal — also added a team save in the second period when she deflected a ball on a Coyote corner kick that was heading dangerously close to the UCSD net. “Give our girls credit, not one of their better games,” McManus said, “But lot of teams would have folded under the pressure and they stood up to it well.” After defeating the Coyotes, the Tritons aimed their sights on the Cal Poly Pomona Broncos. Freshman defender Haley Johnson netted her second goal of the season in the games 13th minute and UCSD’s defense held strong en route to the 1-0 final score. Armstrong’s second shutout in as many games gave the Triton’s their ninth win over their previous ten games. The victory assures the Tritons a spot in the CCAA Championships, a guarantee that will give the team some breathing room over the final two games of the regular season. “The pressure is starting to get to the younger players now,” McManus said. “We have to try to get that out of their heads and just get them concentrated to play one game at a time.” The Tritons next play at home on Friday, Oct. 30 against Cal State Los Angeles, who currently sits one place behind UCSD in the conference standings. Readers can contact John Beck at [email protected] ...

Win Streak Reaches Thirteen Games

WOMEN’S VOLLEYBALL —UCSD notched two more wins last week to maintain its spot atop conference standings and solidify its No. 2 national ranking. In their weekend opener on Oct. 22, the Tritons defeated Cal State Dominguez Hills in three sets before beating No. 22 Cal State Los Angeles in four sets the following night — a match that saw sophomore outside hitter Hillary Williamson rack up a team-leading 15 kills and a .444 hitting clip. The wins improve UCSD’s record to 22-1 (14-1 in the California Collegiate Athletic Association). In their first set against Cal State Los Angeles, the Tritons played evenly with the Golden Eagles throughout the night, as neither team was able to pull away. Both teams displayed solid offense, but effective net play allowed the Tritons to grab an 11-6 lead in the first set, forcing a Cal State Los Angeles timeout. The Golden Eagles came out with renewed energy and stormed back into the match, but senior outside hitter Sylvia Schmidt pulled UCSD to the finish with impressive hitting and pinpoint serving. The Tritons ended the first set with a 25-23 first-set victory after a missed serve by the Golden Eagles. “It was a physical game,” senior captain outside hitter Karen Reis said. “We played well, but it could have gone either way.” In the second set, the two teams battled head to head, flexing their offensive muscles and consistently swapped points and lead changes. Sophomore outside hitter Katie Condon’s serves helped the Tritons scratch out a marginal advantage, and as the Golden Eagles battled back, both squads got a little rowdy. Outbursts from the Triton bench earned the team a yellow card — a penalty that could have proved a major distraction for UCSD. Rather than playing down to their penalty, however, UCSD came out firing to regain a small lead. The set remained up for grabs until Williamson’s kill clinched a 27-25 victory. “All of the games were two-point games,” head coach Tom Black said. “There was no margin of error. When you’re playing a team at the top of their game, it’s a hard game.” As in the first two sets, neither team was able to take control in the third, with both teams staying within three points of one another. Though the Tritons played tough, the Golden Eagles took a small lead late in the set that forced the Tritons to play catch up. The Tritons pulled to within 23-24, but a UCSD net violation at game point handed the Golden Eagles their first set win of the night. “They’re a good team,” Black said. “We just didn’t transition as well as I thought we usually do.” Building off momentum from their previous win, Cal State Los Angeles jumped to a quick advantage in the fourth set. The Tritons never allowed the Golden Eagles to hang around and claimed an easy 25-11 set to earn their 13th consecutive victory. “We really just put pressure on them in the fourth set,” Reis said. The night before their match with Cal State Los Angeles, the Tritons improved their all time record against Cal State Dominguez Hills to 39-1 with a three-set sweep of the Toros. In the first set, the Tritons stormed to an early lead, taking 11 of the first 15 points in the match and leading by as much as 10 throughout. The onslaught proved too much for the Toros to handle and UCSD took a 25-15 win in the first set. In the second set, the Tritons kept their momentum up and scored the first five points before the Toros pulled within 9-7. However, as Cal State Dominguez Hills edged closer, Williamson went on a kill streak, nailing three consecutive points for the Tritons and reclaiming a definitive hold on the match. UCSD extended its lead throughout the set, and Williamson eventually put down the game-winning kill to end the set 25-20. In the match’s third and final set, the Tritons faltered early but pulled together nicely with flawless play to make the score12-5, a lead that would stick as UCSD cruised to an easy 25-13 win to sweep the Toros. The Tritons took both games despite an unusual travel schedule that included a game at Cal State Dominguez Hills on Thursday before heading back to San Diego to host the Golden Eagles on Friday night. “I was a little worried about the travel schedule,” Black said. “but it was great to come out so fast and get the win so quickly.” UCSD travels north next weekend to face Cal State Stanislaus on Oct. 30 and Chico State. Readers can contact Tyler Nelson at [email protected] ...

Women Take Second, Men Fifth at CCAA Champs

CROSS COUNTRY — Traveling nearly the entire way up California’s coast to race in a pressure-filled conference championship against the nation’s top Division-II squads set up UCSD’s runners for difficult conditions last Saturday. Two strong races later, none of it proved to be much of a problem. The UCSD cross country team competed in the 2009 California Collegiate Athletic Association Champions Oct. 24 at Humboldt State University in Arcata, Calif. The Triton women had their best finish in years — taking second place overall — while the men’s team took fifth place. The women’s impressive performance follows three consecutive third-place seasons at conference championships, marking one of the best performances the Tritons have had as a member of the CCAA. The effort was not enough to break the dominance of Chico State, however, whose team claimed their second consecutive conference title and their sixth title in eight years. The Wildcats are currently the top-ranked team nationally in Division II. The women were led by junior Bre Schofield’s second-place finish. After completing the 6K course in 22:13, she was awarded with her second straight all-CCAA recognition. However, Schofield was far from alone in her strong performance — it took solid running from the entire team had a solid day to hold off rival Cal Poly Pomona by only seven points. Senior Marie Schaper finished 18th on the day with a time of 23:44, while sophomore Elena Inouye came in less than one second behind her to take 19th place. Sophomore Aaryn Kobayashi and junior Caprice Thompson took 24th and 32nd respectively to round out the scoring for UCSD. The collaborative effort worked greatly to the team’s advantage — all seven Tritons were able to finish before Cal Poly’s fifth runner crossed the line. “We were really pleased with what the women accomplished,” head coach Nate Garcia said. “They came up here with a clear focus on what they wanted to accomplish and we were happy to see them able [to] realize that.” Cal State Los Angeles senior Vivien Wadeck was the overall women’s winner for the second straight year, becoming only the second repeat champion in the history of the women’s CCAA Championshs. The Triton men saw less success at the meet, earning a total of 119 points — only one more than fourth place Cal State Stanislaus. The UCSD runners had a strong showing as a team, however, with the top three Triton finishers crossing the line within 15 seconds of each other. Senior Mike Wright was the first Triton to finish in 26:22, good for 22nd place in the 8K race. He was followed by sophomores Jeremy Riley and John Svet, who finished 23rd and 24th, respectively. “Humboldt got in front of us early, and ended up getting in their top seven before our top five,” Baum said. “At regionals, we’ll look to reign in Stanislaus and we’ll have our eye on Humboldt.” First-place Chico State was led by conference champion Jimmy Elam to win their eighth consecutive CCAA Championships. The Wildcats fielded five of the first seven finishers and are ranked third nationally in Division II. “It’s always tough when you lose a race by just a point,” Garcia said. “But I feel confident that with a good effort and a little bit better day they can turn in better results at the regional meet.” The Tritons’ next race will be the NCAA Division II West Regionals, which will be held at the home course of San Francisco State University on Nov. 7. ...

My Night as a Pro Journalist

[caption id="attachment_11904" align="alignleft" width="188" caption="Erik Jepsen/Guardian"][/caption] Playing their annual preseason game at the San Diego Sports Arena, the Los Angeles Lakers were nice enough to grant me full media access to their Oct. 23 match against the Denver Nuggets. For one night, I was a professional sports journalist. The experience was overwhelming — so much that that I spent my first hour experiencing facial bipolar disorder: I would break out in an enormous, goofy grin at the thought of being courtside at a Lakers game then immediately go expressionless as I tried to look professional and fit it. After finding my seat at the media table directly behind the Nuggets bench, my photographer and I went to the ESPN hospitality room to grub on the complimentary buffet dinner. I almost threw up my free meal from excitement when — while walking through the tunnel to the court I crossed paths with current Lakers assistant coach and NBA legend Kareem Abdul-Jabbar. I nodded and he nodded back. I felt cool. As opening tip-off approached, the experience of being a sports journalist intensified. Players from both teams were now on the court for warm-ups and there I was, shooting the breeze with the other writers as fans filled the stands. As the start of the game approached I settled into my spot at the media table — with a writer from ESPN.com on my left and one from the German Press Agency (random) on my right. I was so close behind the Denver bench that I could have easily reached out and touched any of the hulking players — which I eventually did do when Chris “Birdman” Andersen offered me an epic fist bump after our brief conversation in the third quarter. As the final tune-up before the regular season starts next week, the game itself was pretty irrelevant; what made the night incredible was watching and listening to the players during the course of the night. No matter how many mega pixels your HDTV has, nothing compares to hearing the players curse a bad call or to being downstream of the sweat and smells wafting from the bench. In the second quarter both benches emptied when the Lakers’ Lamar Odom got in a shoving match with the Nuggets’ Kenyon Martin, giving me the chance to see the emotion and machismo of professional basketball in its most raw form. Overhearing Birdman Andersen — a recovering drug addict — from three feet away yelling about the scuffle is about as close to being a part of the game as you can get without covering your body in tattoos and growing seven inches. The incident also allowed me to see Denver’s star player, Carmelo Anthony, acting like a reformed goofball. Anthony — who served a 15-game suspension in 2006 for a on-court fight with the New York Knicks — stayed on the bench as his teammates streamed out onto the court. Very aware of his previous outburst, Melo laid down, winding his arms and legs through five chairs in a make-shift straight jacket. Smirking from ear to ear, the Nugget’s perenial all-star joking repeated “hold me back, hold me back.” Scenes like that are never important or interesting enough to be covered by major media networks, but it was that exact type of pro sports subtlety that was so refreshing to see up close. The game lacked the star power of a normal match — Kobe Bryant and most of the starters played only in the first quarter — but magic of my journalistic experience was waiting in the post-game interviews. After hearing from both head coaches in the tunnel, I joined the swarming mass of reporters as we slithered into the Lakers locker room. Even the decrepit state of the San Diego Sports Arena and its pathetic facilities couldn’t sully the fact that I was about to go fully behind the scenes and speak in person with some of the world’s biggest sports stars. I didn’t really know what to expect from such a privileged vantage point into the lives of pro athletes. I wasn’t sure if I would feel awkward or not for intruding on their personal space. Imagine being forced to talk to strangers the moment you step out of the shower. There wasn’t really a sense of pressure or anxiety after the preseason game, but I wondered how intrusive it must be to approach athletes after an important game. If anything it made me respect professional athletes even more; dealing with the media is such a huge part of their job description and one that must get pretty tedious after a while. Admittedly, I was pretty nervous when I walked into the room where the Lakers were icing up and changing into their street clothes. I wanted to make sure that I looked professional and scored interviews fast instead of awkwardly standing around while naked millionaires got dressed. I walked in, saw Derrick Fisher sitting down and threw my digital recorder in his face while blurting out a question about the game. Fisher stared at me for the longest two seconds of my life, motioned down with his eyes and said, “Normally I at least have my pants on.” Apparently you’re not supposed to prod players for interviews while they’re only wearing a towel. Lesson learned. A little embarrassed, I walked over to the corner where Kobe was addressing a group of reporters. I was more than happy just to stick my microphone in with the sea of waving microphone-yielding arms and observe the delicate tango between players and journalists. I was surprised at how approachable Kobe and his Lakers teammates where — and none seemed bothered to talk with a college kid who was trying his hardest to look nonchalant. No matter how comfortable I felt around my new acquaintances, however, I still didn’t dare talk to Artest, the Lakers’ new hitman, whose face is permanently frozen in a prison mug shot. Hulking in the corner was DJ Mbenga, the Lakers’ backup center. Standing at a modest seven feet tall and weighing a humble 255 pounds, Mbenga looked like a giant trying to blend in at a dwarf convention. Born in the Democratic Republic of Congo but raised in Belgium, Mbenga speaks very limited English and didn’t have a single reporter asking him about his evening’s solid performance — 14 points while spelling the injured Pao Gasol and Andrew Bynam. Mbenga looked hesitantly at me as I walked towards him — assumingly unenthused about having to do another interview in English. Despite his initial surprise at my speaking in French Mbenga opened up and happily talked with me. When I eventually left the Lakers clubhouse and walked out of the stadium I felt a calm sense of accomplishment. For one night I had been a professional journalist and aside from briefly annoying a near-naked point guard I did a damn good job. I held up the appearance of a seasoned sports writer, asked poignant questions and got a great sense for a profession that — if it weren’t for the impending death of print media — I would love to pursue for a living. Along with picking up solid tips on how to be a pro journalist from other writers I also absorbed a lot of random facts that the average fan could never pick up on from simply watching a game. Chief among these tidbits is the fact that Denver head coach George Karl’s left pinky finger bends straight out to the side at the joint and that Laker forward Adam Morrison’s mustache somehow looks even more slimy in person. Ah, the benefits of behind-the-scenes access. Seeing as how basketball isn’t my favorite sport — baseball gets that honor — the Lakers game was the perfect place for me to earn my journalistic chops. Sure, I was excited about mingling with basketball stars all night, but I was never so giddy that I was more of a fan than a writer. While sitting courtside I couldn’t help but think about how great it would be to do this professionally: following teams, interviewing players and writing articles seems like the greatest job possible. The challenges of becoming a journalist were evident all around me — most of the other writers at the table were middle-aged, a fact that speaks volumes about how severely the job is in decline and how difficult it is for a writer to get started. Despite my love for sports and a whole lot of ambition, I most likely will never become a journalist — and I’m okay with that because for one night in San Diego, I was and it was incredible. ...

Tracking the Master

[caption id="attachment_11899" align="alignleft" width="162" caption="Christina Aushana/Guardian"][/caption] You’ve seen it before: a humble request from distressed Dutch citizen Romeo Ormskerk, promising you “in absolute trust in god” he’ll place $25 million in your bank account. After all, you — a responsible college student — are as trustworthy a business partner as any. But no matter how many car bombs and insurgents threaten Ormskerk, he may have just posed an even greater threat to your computer. Here at UCSD, a team at the Collaborative Center for Internet Epidemiology and Defenses — led by computer science and engineering associate professor Stefan Savage — has been working to halt the latest trends in cybercrime. They were recently granted $7 million from the U.S. Navy to continue conducting the cutting-edge research on botnets they began in 2008. This research enabled them to figure out something no one had been able to determine before: exactly how many people receive a specific spam e-mail, click on a link within it, and ultimately purchase that pill promising to make him longer and wider – or whatever product the e-mail was attempting to sell. The latest criminal tool in 21st century drive-by downloads, a botnet is a network (“net”) of computers (“bot”) controlled by a spammer called the “bot master.” Once you download a virus, usually with an accidental mouse click, it sends out spam to all other computers in your network. All without leaving a trace back to the bot master. According to Savage, when the botnet concept emerged online in the early ’90s, it was only designed to send self-perpetuating insults via e-mail. However, most spammers were soon “blacklisted” by anti-spam campaigns and filters or blocked from sending outgoing mail. They needed a new outlet to continue their attacks – one where they themselves wouldn’t be the target. “The people writing worms, viruses, and malicious software and the people who send spam got together,” said Savage. “It was like, when you infect these machines, instead of doing nothing, why don’t you set up a relay so I can send my e-mail through one of your machines. So, all this e-mail will not come from me. Instead, it will appear like 10 messages from the infected machines.” And that was the beginning of the cybercrime renaissance. Upon the success of these spammers, botnets became a hot commodity on the underground cybermarket. “It’s cheap,” Savage said. “The going rate for an individual [computer] is not more than a few dollars. Most are probably just pennies. So, you can get 1,000 computers for fairly cheap.” According to Savage, buying infected computers is just like any other commodity market. “You just go online, and you can buy compromised machines all over the world. ‘I want computers in Uruguay; I want computers in Spain.’ People try to send more spam during Christmas.” As botnets evolved, large networks of compromised computers could be used for credit-card theft, identity theft and online extortion. Due to vague laws and differing international definitions regarding cybercrime, botnets are still a relatively new worldwide phenomenon that remains mysterious to cyber-police like Savage. One botnet, named Storm Worm (for the popular subject line: “230 dead as storm batters Europe.”), infected computers from December 2006 to early 2008. It became the world’s largest network of infected computers within three months of its inception, infecting over an estimated one million computers nationwide, including several computers at UCSD. Though the Worm was used mainly to send spam, particularly for small pharmaceutical companies, it functioned much like peer-to-peer file-sharing networks such as BitTorrent and Kazaa. However, Muir College senior Brandon Enright, a security analyst at UCSD’s Administrative Computing and Telecommunications, said that these worms weren’t dangerous. “These were not the harmful botnets. The [ACMS] — the people who work on your computers — love the Worm because it’s easy to identify, and allows them to easily clean student computers.” Although the Storm Worm only infected a handful of UCSD computers, Enright wanted to stop the botnets from returning to campus for good. He was able to reverse-engineer a “crawler” — a computer program that harvests e-mail addresses from spam — to quickly track down computers in the infected network. After developing his program, Enright obtained a copy of the malware in order to look further into how its protocol worked. After that, he was able to create a program that could infiltrate this specific variant Worm’s protocol. “I gave it one host, and it asked other computers to tell me about their neighbors. So, I contacted those [computers] and asked them to tell me about their neighbors. Eventually, I get a list of every single infected computer on the network.” But the crawler was by no means perfect. The Heisenbot Uncertainty Principle states that there is always a certain amount of error within a crawler’s estimated numbers, due to the large volume of computers on the network. “It’s like a street, where at any point and time there can be multiple cars entering and leaving,” Enright said. “It’s like [the game] telephone, where you ask a bunch of cars to tell me about the car next to them. But, by the time it gets back to me, the car that one of the other cars mentioned might not be there anymore.” After learning of Enright’s list of infected computers that Enright found with his crawler, Savage invited the student to work with his team of researchers. “The [infected computers] need some way of communicating back to [the bot master], so we try to understand how the command control works,” Savage said. “That way, we can monitor what the botnets are being told to do — what they are saying they have done.” The team has now switched its main focus toward the economics of cybercrime, putting an emphasis on spam e-mails. “We were able to confuse about 1 percent of the botnets,” Savage said. “So, 1 percent of botnets were confused into sending an e-mail with a Web link which pointed to [Web sites] that we control. We were able to answer the question no one has answered before: How many people get the mail, click on the link and then go to the site and buy?” The team monitored the Storm botnet in computers they purposely infected for about 20 days last year. Within that time period, they estimated that a spammer selling generic drugs for a hired pharmacy could make approximately $3 million to $4 million a year through spam e-mails alone. By gaining more specific knowledge of spammer profits, Savage hopes to understand the cost benefits behind cybercrime and find ways to combat it. Understanding these business models, he says, will make it easier to fight cybercrime from an insider’s perspective. “We’re trying to understand things from the criminal’s point of view,” Savage said. “It’s hard to decide the right way to combat something if you don’t know the weaknesses, like the bottlenecks in [spammer profits] and what effects them.” Although Savage is focusing primarily on cybercrime economics, he’s found some techniques to infiltrate botnets along the way. “One of the interests in the Department of Defense is the strategic threat,” Savage said. “They would like to find a way that, if they were infected with a botnet, they can infiltrate it and shut it off, or see what information it could have taken. So we can try to build tools and automate the shutdown process, and test it in a way that’s safe.” However, Savage insists that UCSD will never go so far as to take the war on cybercrime completely into its own hands. “We will never be an operational organization that will shut off botnets,” Savage said. “There’s a whole bunch of legal issues with that. What we’re working on is the technology to infiltrate and, if duly authorized, to shut down.” Ultimately, Savage said his team hopes to work toward the prevention of organized crime networks of the future. “[Spam and cybercrime] are definitely profitable,” Enright said. “It’s basically your 21st century mafia.” Readers can contact Jasmine Ta at [email protected] ...