State Supreme Court Demands Inmates Released

California has until Nov. 10 to reduce prison crowding from 149 to 137 percent capacity

California’s Supreme Court has refused to consider Gov. Jerry Brown’s appeal of an order to reduce prison populations in the state. Brown will have until Jan. 27 to meet a court-ordered population cap mandating the release of over 9,000 additional prisoners.

The state’s push for prison reform began in 2011, when a federal court demanded that California improve prison health conditions. In April 2013, the Supreme Court of California gave Brown 20 days to come up with a plan to reduce the number of inmates or be held in contempt of the court. Brown’s initial plan included releasing certain inmates and sending others to county prisons in order to lessen the pressure on state prisons, which currently hold inmates at up to 149 percent of capacity.

Releasing the additional prisoners will bring state prison overcrowding to 137 percent of capacity. Brown’s plans may not add up to the mandated 9,600 prisoners that need to be released, and the court can order the release of more prisoners on top of its first mandate.

Brown petitioned the initial order to release inmates by December of this year, asking for an additional three years to meet the court’s requirements. The mandate was instead extended to mid-January 2014.

The governor had previously petitioned to eliminate federal oversight of California’s prisons, and stated in a Jan. 2013 press conference that the state should be allowed to run its own system.

“The prison emergency is over in California,” Brown said. “We’ve reduced over 43,000 [inmates]. People act like nothing happened. Billions and billions have been spent. We’ve shaped up; we’re standing at attention; we’re ready to go forward. I’ve taken their own expert, and I’ve made him head of corrections. So what more do they want?”

The administration has also been turning to for-profit prisons to house additional inmates, including one in California City, which will cost the state $28.5 million per year to operate. Federal judges have blocked Brown from sending prisoners to private prisons outside of the state.

Michael Bien is the lead counsel for mental health in Coleman v. Brown, one of two cases aimed to compel Brown to comply with the court’s orders.

“This is an extremely significant ruling, in that Governor Brown and California have been fighting the order of the three-judge court to reduce the prison population,” Bien said. “The prison system and California are not complying with the people.”

The University of California Student Administration has offered its own solution regarding California’s prison problems. The organization is sponsoring Invest in Graduation Not Incarceration, or IGNITE, and is aimed at easing laws that result in long-term prison sentences for nonviolent drug offenders, as well as suspensions for students accused of willful defiance. The UCSA website calls willful defiance an overly broad and arbitrary rationale that results in suspensions and expulsions.

The court that ordered the prison population cap said in April that Brown and his administration blatantly defied the mandate.

“California still houses far more prisoners than its system is designed to house,” the judges said. “At no point over the past several months have defendants indicated any willingness to comply, or made any attempt to comply, with the orders of this court.”

If Brown’s administration fails to comply, the court has threatened to release thousands of prisoners early next year.

3 thoughts on “State Supreme Court Demands Inmates Released

  1. This has all been said before. At one point even the threat of contempt charges. When the state ignored the threats in the end the was nothing more than another extention. Be it weeks or months. The court has simply shown itself to be nothing more than a gorilla pounding it’s chest harmlessly in a zoo.

  2. Other states found that overcrowding is a major cause of prison violence. Incarceration is a major drain on state budgets.

    The need to reduce the number of prisoners packed in like feedlot cattle was not a surprise to California. We had a dot com bubble, a housing bubble, and a prisoner bubble that has expanded for decades. Old-school, fear-mongering politicians hocked tough on crime in hopes of votes, believing (usually correctly) that they would be retired or out of office before the bubble burst.

    Continually expanding the prison industrial complex will not solve our root problems and will increase the school-to-prison pipeline that causes such misery for those convicted and the victims of their crime.

    Do you think corporation prisons requiring quotas for the number of prisoners that must be locked up for profit is good for taxpayers and the United States?

  3. i have researched violent crime,proper sentencing and release,and psychopathy for 2 decades.The psychopath has no empathy and no conscience. they can be any age. they are 1% of the population and 30% of the prison population. they appear sane and the crimes they commit may be non violent or absolute torture. Take a look at the Castro case in Cleveland Ohio. it is beyond the imagination what this fiend did to the 3 women he kidnapped and he looked sane. there are more other crimes than i can fit in my file cabinet.you cant find something unless you know what you are looking for. What you are doing is beyond dangerous. Please have the felons you are releasing examined along the lines of the research of Dr. Robert Hare of the U. of British Columbia.his book “Wthout Conscience” explains it and he has developed a test-the Hare Psychopathic checklist revised. i can be reached at 7089487668for info.URGENT

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